Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

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Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 10:50 am

***We moved this over from DP to here because it keeps getting flagged over there. OK post away! I'll try and clean it up a bit as I have time

*****EDIT: Apparently only I can access the old post since I created it. Oh
well, maybe manystrom will fix the old one. At least I know it is still there.
******

Although the old post has been flagged it can still be accessed here:

http://www.dailypaul.com/...

It even let me add a new comment to the old post...

Let the fun begin for Anybody Getting Their Gardens Ready? Part 2...

=)

Attn Hawkiye
and Martfuncher:


On May 16th, 2008 Kevin Tuma
says:

Attn Hawkiye and Martfuncher: Can we graft this old green thumb thread to
New Freelanders' Forum? Smile

SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

Ok With me if
it's ok withMF





On May 16th, 2008 hawkiye
says:

Ok With me if it's ok with MF

-----
Please Visit New
Freelanders
Self Reliance & Preparedness Forums




No.


On May 16th, 2008 spacehabitats
says:

No, I'm not.



Hey, if it
weren't for my last year's garden


On May 16th, 2008 hopefulfilled
says:

I wouldn't have had any money to send to Ron Paul's campaign.



LOL


On May 16th, 2008 IveSeenTheConst
says:

good one.



Not this %$#@
Again - Flagged


On May 16th, 2008 IveSeenTheConst
says:

I'm going to start a Muscle Car thread - Might as well...
"Flag Corps", you know what to do.

I guess the Iraq/n Wars, Taxes, Economy, Delegate, GOP Conventions,,etc
are secondary to adding lady bugs to your tomato plants.



I'm sick and
tired of





On May 16th, 2008 Kevin Tuma
says:

I'm sick and tired of would-be Forum censors like you.

Why don't you go start your 'muscle car thread' to prove a point?

And in the meantime, shut the hell up..?

SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States



Suggestion




On May 16th, 2008 Acala
says:

Ron Paul supporters are out in front of the crowd when it comes to
understanding what is going on in the economy. We would be foolish not to use
that knowledge to develop strategies for surviving the upcoming economic
collapse. It is in the interest of the R3evolution that we survive, even
thrive, in the coming hard times. In that way we will be better situated to
influence our communities to adopt the ideals of liberty.

That is why we discuss precious metals, foreign stocks and currencies,
firearms, energy and such. American food production is highly dependent on oil
- fertilizers, pesticides, fuel for mechanized farm machinery, fuel for
trucking the produce to market, and fuel for running factories for processing
and packaging. As the price of oil continues to skyrocket, the price of food is
going to follow. If things get REALLY bad, food production is going to become a
local matter.

Learning to produce your own food is a survival technique and, perhaps, the
basis for community outreach. Back in the 70s it was common for communities to
have community gardens where people would work their plots next to each other.
We will see the same thing soon.

I'm not sure what you think you are going to eat if things get bad, but I
don't see that you have any basis to complain about other people planning for
that situation.

So here is my suggestion: ignore the thread if you don't like it. Where is
the harm?



An agrarian
society helps





On May 16th, 2008 Kevin Tuma
says:

An agrarian society helps foster independence. Note how many of our Founding
Fathers were farmers and plantation owners.

SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States



No, all those
things are important to us





On May 16th, 2008 hopefulfilled
says:

and we do what we can about it, try to be delegates, email people about it,
write our reps, write to newspapers, etc, etc. But it gets frustrating, because
sometimes it seems a losing battle. But we WILL keep plugging on. However,
gardening is something that we can do and see results. So, what's wrong with
growing our own food, and doing our part to put Monsanto and the fascist food
regime out of business?



This is a
terrific site





On May 16th, 2008 Kay
says:

and very informative. We are sharing information on growing our own healthy
food. Everyone who comes on here for gardening purposes is friendly and helpful
- no cursing, nasty sarcasm, etc. I come on here several times a day because it
perks me up. There are many threads on Daily Paul I never look at because I'm
not interested. If you're not interested in gardening, then move on to
something else and let others enjoy the gardening thread.



I agree and
resent the thread being flagged.





On May 16th, 2008 bonnieblue
says:

"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you.
Then you win". --Mahatma Gandhi



hey bonnieblue




On May 16th, 2008 alienlve
says:

this guy is on a mission and has been systematically flagging everyones
threads saying they are not relevant,,lord, cant we have a day of peace from
these provacatuers?



Goodmorning,
How about a big hot cup of Freedom of Speech?





On May 16th, 2008 bonnieblue
says:

Gardening is a healthy and productive break from the frustrations we all
suffer over the condition of our country.

Anyone who doesn't like this thread I respectfully ask to just ignore it.
Flagging it repeatedly shows a great disrespect to those of us who enjoy it and
is a very selfish act. Please cease and desist flagging.

"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you.
Then you win". --Mahatma Gandhi



Would you like
to see everyday..





On May 16th, 2008 IveSeenTheConst
says:

"Anyone Souping-Up Their Muscle Cars?" thread ?
no. you wouldn't.

I come to dailyPAUL.com. So i should ignore the off-topic posts just because
they're off-topic? no.
Go to a gardening website or start one.



Start a
website





On May 16th, 2008 IveSeenTheConst
says:

...Call it anyonegettingtheirgardensready.com
I don't care about your damn garden.
I don't care about the FLDS children.



Hey Mart (if
you do get to





On May 16th, 2008 howard722
says:

Hey Mart (if you do get to check in on your trip) bring me back a t-shirt Wink

Yesterday I transplanted my tomatoes from their germination tray to
individual pots. Man oh man, if they aren't "hardened" after my
transplanting I'd be surprised. I hope at least four of the nine make it.


Last edited by hawkiye on Sat 17 May 2008, 12:57 am; edited 2 times in total
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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 10:54 am

As for the potatos; I haven't seen anytting as of yet. It may still be a bit
cold for them to get all active and growing. On the other hand, tires in the
backyard look great Smile. I am wondering if I am gonna get a visit from the city
to "address" the stacks of tires in my backyard; I have uptight
neighbors.



Oh, I am sorry
about the city





On May 16th, 2008 hopefulfilled
says:

and the neighbors. I was once in a city, on the very edge, and they wouldn't
allow me to hang my laundry outside.. Geez, how ridiculous is that? Now I live
30 miles from anywhere on 40 acres, and a couple came from California, (no
offense to Californians), who said they moved here to get away from the laws in
California, and they complained to everyone that I hang my clothes out. But in
order to see my clothes line they have to drive by my house , which is not on
their road to town , and have to hang out of their vehicle to even see
them..... Go figure...



Re: Mart




On May 16th, 2008 pegarizona
says:

I was asked by Mart to post a message here to let everyone know, he was
called away on a business trip. He was given very short notice. He may be out
of town and offline for 1 to 8 weeks, it will depend on internet access, and he
was told that service is very sporadic where he is going. Let’s all wish him a
speedy and safe trip home and let’s keep the garden thread growing in his
absence.

Thank you, Peggy

"I freed thousands of slaves. I could have freed thousands more if they
had known they were slaves."
-- Harriet Tubman



+




On May 15th, 2008 photoshopwiz
says:

oops...wrong aisle...



lol...watch
your step





On May 15th, 2008 pegarizona
says:

Clean up on aisle 7 please...it looks like apple sauce.
Thanks again Dear Lady for the hard word putting this back together. You have
made many people happy.

"I freed thousands of slaves. I could have freed thousands more if they
had known they were slaves."
-- Harriet Tubman



Protecting
Your Food and Garden





On May 15th, 2008 hawkiye
says:

In the post quoted below Desert Rat described how he will be stealing your
food if he can because he is bitter about Y2K not being a big problem. He seems
to insinuate that it was some sort of hoax. No DR it wasn’t a hoax it simply
got enough exposure that most companies went to work and fixed the problem, I
know I worked for a major corp. in IT for a year on fixing the problem. .

He then goes on to say he bought $10,000 worth of “survival” food and it
spoiled because Y2K did not cause a major meltdown. First I am skeptical he
bought “survival” foods especially$10,000 worth since at that time for about
$500 to $1000 you could get a years supply of staples. However for sake of
argument let’s say he did. If so he got conned because any real kind of
survival food is going to keep for a minimum of 2 to five years depending on
what it is and some up to ten years or more if you bought the right stuff like
hard wheat and beans and rice etc. stored in number 10 cans with oxygen
absorbers. Freeze dried foods will keep for at least a couple of years and
MRE’s will keep for many years. Even canned food from the market will keep for
a couple years and sometimes more. So I don’t know what was bought but it
wasn’t “survival” food. .

So now comes my main point. DR uses all these excuses to not prepare now for
inevitable hard times except to rob and justify murdering you and me for our
food and preparations if he can get away with it. But he claims he will ask
nicely first but if we don’t give he will take as if asking nicely first would
make him any a less a thief and murderer. He emphasizes his arsenal as a threat
and claims when he tried to eat his food storage it was so bad he would only
last a week on it (again peaking my skepticism as to what he actually stored)
insinuating he would have become a looter and murderer anyway had Y2K caused
societal breakdown. .

I would just like to thank DR for showing his true colors and what a scumbag
he is for planning on stealing and killing from you and me to survive the
coming collapse. All I can say is I hope some real patriot puts you and your
ilk out of their misery early in such a scenario because you are no lover of
liberty and no Ron Paul supporter! .

However you have hopefully taught some folks here a valuable lesson in
protecting themselves and what kind of mindset many otherwise seemingly good
people have about this scenario and what will happen. Read and Learn folks! .

It's great that everyone is getting into gardening, but…
On April 24th, 2008 Desert Rat says: .


“If a food crisis actually happens as so many here predict, all of your
neighbors are going to know who has the food. If your gardens are not looted,
then prepare for an armed home invasion. People could be murdered for a jar of
home canned Lima beans.


It wasn't long ago that Y2K was going to shut down all of commerce when
every computer in the world (except MacIntosh's) would reset from 1999 to 1900
instead of 2000. I uprooted my family from Pasadena, California and moved to
the little crap-hole town of Alpine, Texas to escape what I believed would be
unbelievable chaos in the large cities. I bought over $10,000.00 worth of
survival foods, seeds and supplies of all types. I bought sacks of junk silver
coins for bartering. So, what happened after all of the hype? …Nothing. All of
my survival food has long since spoiled. I tried consuming some of it, but it
tasted bad enough that I knew that I could never stand more that about a week
of such fare.


Bottom line. It never hurts to have a garden. In fact it's a great idea
when times are normal or in places where everyone else is growing one. The
things that I have kept from Y2K is a sizable armory of various semi-automatic
weapons and ammo. If the time ever comes where it becomes becomes a matter life
and death for my family vs. yours… Well, let's just say that I will not whimper
off to die of starvation along with my family. After being denied food by
politely asking someone for it, they had better be prepared to defend their
food hoard/stash to the death, because I will be totally fixated on taking it…
And I will, or I'll die trying.
.


Sorry. That's just they way things will be if it gets bad enough to drive
men to disparate measures. So include me (and others like me) in your plans for
survival, because the REAL world is a total bitch.”


-----
Please Visit New
Freelanders
Self Reliance & Preparedness Forums




Yep, the
entire post was





On May 16th, 2008 Kevin Tuma
says:

Yep, the entire post was disingenuous.

If he had bought $10,000 worth of survival food, most of it would still be
good now. Heck, bismati rice from Sam's Club lasts 5 or 6 years in an ordinary
burlap sack. Wheat lasts indefinitely if properly packaged. Freeze-dried lasts
at least thirty years; MREs last--oh, around seven to ten years, if I'm not
mistaken.

SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States



Thanks
hawkiye...





On May 15th, 2008 kat
says:

i remember his original post...and I also remember thinking that this midset
will be prevelant....I want to wish on a utopia of people cooperating with one
another...growing gardens and getting by peacefully...But deep down inside I
know the truth is...

There will be more of his type than of ours...
_____________________________________

"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."

Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"



All I can say
is....





On May 15th, 2008 chilly
willy
says:

My back!! My back!! All this gardening has been doing on a number on me.
Hopefully the pain will be worth it.



A bit off
topic, but could be important





On May 15th, 2008 BigT
says:

I've made this suggestion to other groups over the years.
Nobody ever seems to make it a reality, but I keep trying to suggest.

Local Paul groups or freedom groups who are already connected thru state or
local political meet-ups can expand this connection into improved
self-sufficiency thru co-ops.

For food production, a local group could delegate crop varieties to the
interested landowners who want to do the farming. Each farmer could specialize
in a few certain crops or livestock, which could streamline production by
specialization. Then, the group has harvest-time trade-meets where the crops
are traded between the people, ie: Farmer A trades his corn for Farmer B's
turnips, or whatever.
The people who want to participate but are not landowners or have restrictions
which preclude any farming, may help with the labor of the farmers, and thus
gain a stake in the trading setup to ensure that they will benefit from their
labors. Or they could do the canning or jarring, or milling, or host the
parties where everyone meets to do the harvest chores. Or they could chip-in
for purchasing needed equipment for the farming. It's all up to the people
involved to agree on, and do.

It can be all non-GMO or organic, or whatever you like to grow. You ensure
yourselves a "known" food supply, do not contribute to the coffers of
the agra-corps, do not feed the beast taxes, get way healthier food than from
the grocery store, and also have some community fun.

This expands the solidarity of the groups into more than just political, and
you become a community with skills and benefits and commerce structure which
can benefit all of you in the hard times to come.

Just a suggestion.
Anyone who likes the idea for their group may run with this ball or any desired
modificatiion/incarnation of the idea, and expand their self-sufficiency and
improve their overall conditions in a collapse.

Yes, there will be kinks and hurdles to overcome and smooth-out before
everything works out as a viable system, but it is do-able, has been proven to
work over thousands of years, and can help you if you really try to make it
work. Particularly in the expected hard times coming that many of us see as pretty
much inevitable.

Good luck!



Double Digging





On May 15th, 2008 Acala
says:

Now that the new chickens are in their new coop, I will begin double digging
my garden this weekend, adding composted horse manure to the organic-poor
Arizona soil. I'm getting a late start because I didn't have time to do it
right in the early spring. I should be able to get a monsoon corn crop in and
then a fall crop.

So, dig in the organic stuff and loosen the soil, build an impregnable
rabbit barrier, form the basins, and the Liberty Garden is good to go!

Then I'll plant some mesquite trees. They are drought resistant and the pods
and beans are highly nutritious.

The 2kw solar system goes on the roof next week. And the water harvesting
system after that.



Get a Rabbit
Trap





On May 16th, 2008 chilly
willy
says:

Catch a doe and a buck, build a few hutches and you're red meat for free for
good. The term "hump like bunnies" didn't come from nowhere you know
Surprised)



Gardening here
in Florida is





On May 15th, 2008 bigmikedude
says:

Gardening here in Florida is not really as easy as it was in Ohio. The bugs
here are nuclear class, and I believe they have military training, particularly
in psy-ops. I am but a feeble adversary to them. The heat and sun cause most
vegetables to form far too rapidly, hardening the skins and producing lousy
fruit. Growing season is actually very limited here, to the cooler season,
which is also usually extremely dry. Sand and bright sun form a lethal
combination.

I do however, have some banana trees, and a lake behind me to fish in. I
guess if I get tired of baked fish with banana sauce I could start eyeing up
one of those turkeys that waddles through my yard each day.

Hmmm, I wonder what Sandhill Crane with Armadillo gravy tastes like????
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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 10:56 am

I just bet
Michael will get





On May 15th, 2008 Realdeal
says:

I just bet Michael will get your original post back. It had all the makings
of a dailypaul legend.

"Bloom where you are planted."



I feel like..




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. he will too. =)



YUM




On May 15th, 2008 nosurf
says:

Corn is just popping up.
Radishes are going strong for 2nd week.
Tomatoes have taken transplant and are starting to fill out.
Potatoes are bushing up.
Lettuce doing well.
Only 2 broccolis survived bunny raid, but are recovering.
Peas coming along.

Need to plant 2 more tomatoes since I have the baskets (24 total)
need some basil, rosemary and thyme.
cucumber seeds need to go in.
need to plant some cilantro also, for salsa.



I'm a rotten
gardener...





On May 15th, 2008 kat
says:

I usually put them in the ground and say "Good Luck"...It may be
days or weeks before I look in on them...And this morning I went back there to
notice that things are looking pretty good (much to my surprise)

The one thing that seems to be doing best are my stalks of sugar
cane...(shrug) Go figure...

I got a food dehydrator for mothers day...

Can you dehydrate sugar cane? I've been all over the internet and can't find
a way to perserve it.
______________________________

"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."

Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"



I buy organic
dehydrated cane syrup





On May 15th, 2008 hopefulfilled
says:

so I suppose you could extract the juice, boil it down and dehydrate it,
then grind it up.



Basically..




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. you eat it fresh or preserve it by getting it milled for sugar and cane
syrup.



Seed Vault




On May 15th, 2008 LastAmericanStanding
says:

I'm looking to put away some veggie seeds but I'm not sure about storage.
I've read that if properly kept, seeds can last for several years. I don't have
the money to build a seed vault into the side of some Nordic mountain but I
would like to have some on-hand should the 'lights go out' .
Anyone have any suggestions?



I know the
seed vault,





On May 16th, 2008 Kevin Tuma
says:

I know the seed vault, no-hybrid heirloom thing makes for interesting
conversations, but have you considered perennials/root vegetables first?

Asparagus, pumpkins, rhubarb, sweet potatoes, et al., are perennials if I'm
not mistaken. Potatoes are easily grown. You wouldn't have to ever stockpile
seeds for them.

SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States



Not all seed
storage is the same..





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

...but storing in paper bags in a cool dark dry place works for most seeds.



Mart...Quick
question...





On May 15th, 2008 kat
says:

My mother...an avid gardener...told me that seeds only store for one year at
best...Is that true?
_____________________________-

"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."

Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"



It depends...




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. on the type of seed. The harder drier seeds tend to last much longer.
I've planted 5 year old peas and beans and they grew.

The softer the seed the less time will they will stay viable...



Hello, I can
answer this question





On May 15th, 2008 hopefulfilled
says:

http://faculty.matcmadiso...
This is pretty accurate according to my experience in using old seed. Don't
even think of trying onion seed older than a year, waste of time. Oh, by the
way, it is good to put a little powdered milk in a small envelope in the jar
with your stored seeds. It absorbs moisture, keeping them better.



I've had
success..





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. with some pretty old seed before (3-5 years old) including peas, beans,
turnips. It really depends on the kind of seed.

My grandmother had some 10 year old collard green seeds in her freezer and
they grew like gangbusters. =)



Inspiring
Video - Permaculture





On May 15th, 2008 liveFreedom
says:

I found this video
absolutely inspiring!

I recently obtained a copy of, and started reading, Bill Mollison's Permaculture,
A Designers Manual
, and I can't put it down. Out of curiousity, has anyone
else here worked with Permaculture techniques in their gardens and/or homelife?

Glad to see this thread back!

-LF



Groovy
Video...





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

It's amazing how much stuff they get out of 1/10th an acre...



YES! I have
his Introduction to Permaculture





On May 15th, 2008 hopefulfilled
says:

Mine is more down to earth practical, but I have seen another, not by him,
that is even more so. Gaia's Garden is good too. I have tried many of the
things in his book. The main thing I am using from his book, and another from
my library (Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands), is his stuff on keeping the
water where you need it, as we are in a severe drought, and get our water with
a generator (price of gas makes it prohibitive). One plant I use extensively is
Egyptian onions, a perennial that pretty much takes care of itself, reseeds
itself, and generally improves the soil, and draws earthworms.It isn't like a
regular onion, except for the flavor, but i have had onions from my garden
since February, and I am in the north. I am trying this year another perennial
green, Good King Henry, will let you know in the later summer how it does. It
is so much easier having perennials all over and coming up to eat without
having to plant, and nuture them into fruition. Also, I have permanent beds in
my garden, and let dill, cilantro, chamomile , lettuces, and greens go to seed,
and never have to plant them. Of course there is the usual: rhubarb,
strawberries, sorrel (ever had sorrel soup?), horseradish, and most perennial
herbs.



I was so upset
when





On May 15th, 2008 quiltingsando
says:

I clicked on it and it said access denied. I bookmarked that post because
there was so much information that I wanted to keep it and read it at a later
date. I had no idea someone would flag it, damn. All that great info gone what
the hell, why flag it? That thread wasn't hurting anyone it gave us a break
from all the bickering.



Hopefully...




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. manystrom can restore it. If not I have archived the entire post and will
find someway/somewhere to post it somewhere. Stay tuned...



Ahhh, the
gardening thread





On May 15th, 2008 hopefulfilled
says:

Thanks Mart, sometimes it is so frustrating, dealing with the government
when we get angered by their latest outrage, after writing to our reps. knowing
they probably won't do anything about it, at least we can read here, and work
on our own healthy food, and do something at least. Besides, gardening is
therapeutic, and fun!

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 10:57 am

the
secret garden





On May 15th, 2008 photoshopwiz
says:

__

One of the alltime longest threads deserves the alltime longest
post!

__


Our Dear Martfuncher lost his amazing and magical thread ~
Anybody getting their gardens ready?


Clever fanofwalt astonishingly found some of it, and photoshopwiz
wondrously wove fanofwalt's google links together for you, because

I am, indeed, a Wiz!


...and you've always had the power!____
__

"let it not be said that no one cared, that no one objected once
it's realized that our liberties and wealth are in jeopardy"
~ Congressman Ron Paul


____________________________

http://www.dailypaul.com/...

Oh, Marrrtfuncherrr!!
On May 14th, 2008 fanofwalt says:

It ain't the whole thing, not by a longshot, but, thanks to the wonder of
Google cache, here are some pages of your thread. I strongly suggest you copy
and paste these in your own computer ASAP!

Note: I'm using Safari, and I see that "Safari" is noted within
the codes for the search results, so it is possible that these links may not
work for non-Safari browsers (I don't know). But you can search Google thusly:
"anybody getting their gardens ready?" site:dailypaul.com
...and in the results, instead of clicking on the headlines, click on the tag
reading "cache" at the end of the listing.

Luv2Bfree, I do not see the original thread as available. Perhaps you have a
magic PC?

Here's what I've found via Google cache:

Page 1, as retrieved on May 6, 2008
Page 5, as retrieved on May 6, 2008
Page 21, as retrieved on May 6, 2008
Page 3, as retrieved on May 4, 2008
Page 4, as retrieved on May 4, 2008
Node 44113, as retrieved on May 3, 2008
(seems to be the front page only of the thread)
Page 2, as retrieved on May 3, 2008
Page 8, as retrieved on April 21, 2008

Hope you are able to get all the rest of it back!!!!

____

Anybody getting their gardens ready?

Posted March 26th, 2008 by martfuncher

I've been tilling my gardens most of the day.
Getting ready to plant several kinds of beans/peas, tomatoes, peppers,
some herbs, sunflowers, radishes, cucumbers, watermelons, muscadines...

=)

output

Comment viewing options:

__________________________________________________

>>>>> Daily Paul Page 1 <<<<<
Google Node 44113

Node 44113, as retrieved on May 3, 2008

__________________________________________________

Fish Water
On May 2nd, 2008 JohnFromChicago says:

I have two big tiger oscars and a plecostumus in a 110 tank. I I feed them
live food about once a week. I clean the tank once a month by siphoning 10
gallons off the bottom of the tank. This is the best water you could possibly
use on your garden. If you garden, I would strongly recommend getting a fish
tank.
I've only got a small space, so I'm doing a few jalapenos, radishes, onions,
and a tomato.
http://www.youtube.com/pr...

_____

You are sooooo.....
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

correct!
_________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Okay..This is off topic in a way..
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

But it may help some people..
I own a pet store and my friend Rob was getting his home in the country broken
into everytime he went to work in New Orleans...Meth heads more than
likely...What ever they couldn't steal, they would trash and he has been trying
to store food and start gardens..They poisoned his dogs...and he really didn't
know what to do since he was temporarily laid off and couldn't afford to move
anywhere...
Twice his food storage area was found and destroyed out of maliciousness even
though it was hidden.
So in talking one day I decided to help him out ...I sold him 30 tarantulas and
had him put them with his stored food to free roam...
His house was broken into...ONCE...and nothing was touched...a few months later
and not one incident...Guess they work..
He also told me today that he has had not one pest or insect problem since
introducing them..
Maybe instead of guns and dogs we could just use these little critters!
-------------------------------------------
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Would tarantulas eat
On May 3rd, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

aphids? I have a greenhouse/sunroom and I have been having problems with
aphids and the usual organic things don't seem to be working. Of course my 13
year old is arachnaphobic. That would be a problem, but then again, he never
works in my greenhouse. Smile

_____

How much..
On May 2nd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. are tarantulas going for these days?
*hugs@kat*

_____

A Big Tarantula hug right back!
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

I gave them to him at cost...Really? Are you interested? I'm your girl !
I'll even throw in a couple of scorpions.for fun!
_____________________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Kat, I wonder about you!
On May 3rd, 2008 akak says:

So Kat, you keep tarantulas, and snakes, and scorpions all running around
your house ---- are you Satan's mistress? Would the pungent whiff of burning
brimstone greet me at your door? Do the neighbors' children "somehow"
never come around on Halloween? (or even worse, "disappear" when they
do?)
Inquiring minds want to know!

_____

Can I..
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. feed the scorpions to the tarantula? =)
If I did get a tarantula(s) it would be for a pet...

_____

Kat, so do they roam free
On May 2nd, 2008 akak says:

Kat, so do they roam free through the WHOLE HOUSE?! I'm not one of those
fraidy-scared-of-miniscule-spiders people, but I don't think even I would want
one or several of those things crawling on me in bed!

_____

You are sooooo.....
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

correct!
_________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Okay..This is off topic in a way..
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

But it may help some people..
I own a pet store and my friend Rob was getting his home in the country broken
into everytime he went to work in New Orleans...Meth heads more than
likely...What ever they couldn't steal, they would trash and he has been trying
to store food and start gardens..They poisoned his dogs...and he really didn't
know what to do since he was temporarily laid off and couldn't afford to move
anywhere...
Twice his food storage area was found and destroyed out of maliciousness even
though it was hidden.
So in talking one day I decided to help him out ...I sold him 30 tarantulas and
had him put them with his stored food to free roam...
His house was broken into...ONCE...and nothing was touched...a few months later
and not one incident...Guess they work..
He also told me today that he has had not one pest or insect problem since
introducing them..
Maybe instead of guns and dogs we could just use these little critters!
-------------------------------------------
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

How much..
On May 2nd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. are tarantulas going for these days?
*hugs@kat*

_____

A Big Tarantula hug right back!
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

I gave them to him at cost...Really? Are you interested? I'm your girl !
I'll even throw in a couple of scorpions.for fun!
_____________________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Can I..
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. feed the scorpions to the tarantula? =)

_____

Kat, so do they roam free
On May 2nd, 2008 akak says:

Kat, so do they roam free through the WHOLE HOUSE?! I'm not one of those
fraidy-scared-of-miniscule-spiders people, but I don't think even I would want
one or several of those things crawling on me in bed!

_____

You're a chicken...
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

He said he let a few free roam his living room and kitchen area so whoever
broke in would be confronted by them...It worked...
I'm thinking about getting them and maybe some good ball pythons to guard my
secret room off the garage...They pretty much take care of themselves..
No mice...No insects...No problems.
________________________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Hmmmm...... well, I might
On May 2nd, 2008 akak says:

Hmmmm...... well, I might have to pass on the idea,
although I don't think they would thrive up here anyway.
Not really chicken ---- mice and shrews are a common annoyance in most homes
here in
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 10:59 am

Alaska, but they don't scare me. Sometimes I even try to step on them, if I
can catch them out in the open. Now and then I borrow my neighbor's cat for the
purpose: let her stay here for a couple of days, and she cleans them out really
nice.

_____

Okay you're not really a chicken..
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

I take it back..And cats ARE wonderful creatures..But if you ever need a
snake...Just let me know!! Burmese, Ball, Boas...You name it...I'm your girl.
I would love for someone to break into my food supply just to see their face
when I put these guys up in there.
_________________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Got
On May 2nd, 2008 gavination says:

Got my tomatoes, peppers, brussel sprouts, broccoli, and cauliflower in
yesterday. got all my plants for .33 a piece!!!

_____

Plants not seeds?
On May 2nd, 2008 martfuncher says:

Where did you get a deal like that? =)

_____

We are having a two day blizzard
On May 2nd, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

and supposed to go down to 18 degrees tonite. All the quilts I covered my
flowering peach, apricot and pear trees with are gone from the hurricane like
winds, and some of our metal roof, and our 1500 gallon fire water tank. hmmm,
anyone have some country land for sale in New Mexico???

_____

Why..
On May 2nd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. New Mexico? Dry, sandy, water shortages, etc.
The winds took your water tower down? Sounds apocalyptic...=|

_____

I was raised in New England
On May 2nd, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

but I found out that I am solar powered, (not just for electric power),and I
need the sun for my body to have energy, and I abhor humidity. I lived in
Virginia for a while, and I hated the summers, because of that. Well, the tower
was empty, but it still takes 4 guys to move it. It is for summer water for
fires, in case. Our cistern is buried, so that is safe.

_____

Hehe...
On May 2nd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. you would hate Missippi where I'm at. It's the Kingdom of Humidity. =P
I hate it too, but the plants (and bugs) seem to love it...

_____

Today..
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. I tilled up some spots to do the "three sisters" thing. Corn
stalks with bean vines and squash plants all in one. =)

_____

The "three sisters" thing
On May 2nd, 2008 john2k says:

The "three sisters" thing sounds interesting. I might have to give
that a try!

_____

Potato growing bags
On May 1st, 2008 Retrocon says:

I found some at Gardener's Supply Company online. I might give those a
crack, useable at least twice. I want to grow some spuds. They also have nifty
growing ladder things I might get to support the eggplant and bell peppers.
The Retrocon
Hope for America, Ron Paul for President in 2008!

_____

Yah..
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. I've researched as many tomato growing structures as I could find and I
like the tomato ladders from Gardener's Supply also. Although, this year I made
trellises out of bamboo from my bamboo forest. My bamboo trellises work good
but take some work to construct.
I ordered tomato mulch sheets from Gardener's Supply and they got me my order
promptly, in about 3 days, and they have good customer reviews...

_____

That stinks!
On May 1st, 2008 Retrocon says:

I was planning on planting radishes. The seeds are new, so fingers are
crossed.
Do any of you soak seeds before planting?
The Retrocon
Hope for America, Ron Paul for President in 2008!

_____

Most seeds....
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. that require germinating you put on/in a damp(but not wet) paper towel or
sprouting material(from gardening store) for a couple of days to activate
germination.
Radishes generally don't need germinating. Just chunk them in the dirt. Wink

_____

Herbs!
On May 1st, 2008 Retrocon says:

Put seeds for chives, cilantro, sage, and oregano in pots, transplanted
chamomile, fennel, rosemary, basil, and parsley. The brussel sprouts ,
eggplant, bell pepper, and jersey wakefield cabbages seem to be doing well in
the square foot garden. We'll see. I have tomato vines coming, and more herbs.
If the herbs I have don't sprout and grow from seed, I guess I will have to try
again. I have to plant carrots, lettuces, etc etc from seed in another week or
so, once I'm sure of the warmer weather. I hope I get some yield from this, it
is always nervewracking undertaking something like this for the first time with
no practical hands on experience or mentors nearby. Hehehe.
How is everyone else doing? I wish I had the money to get my fruit tree
experiments going. Still have yet to get the lumber for the rain barrels. At
least I have three days off in a row, I will take care of some business! Smile
The Retrocon
Hope for America, Ron Paul for President in 2008!

_____

I put..
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. homegrown oregano, chives and sage in my last batch of spaghetti and it
was primo deelish. A whole different world than the stuff from jars/cans... =)

_____

So far, so good
On May 1st, 2008 Kay says:

I'm getting lots of lettuce, potatoes have sprouted nicely, tomatoes, summer
squash and peppers are growing as are the peas. Some of my radishes haven't
developed but the seed was pretty old so maybe that's the reason.

_____

Radishes...
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. usually do better as a winter crop.

_____

Here in Virginia
On May 1st, 2008 Kay says:

we usually plant them in early spring. My white radishes, which were new
seeds, are doing fine. I'm going to test the soil to make sure I have all the
nutrients I need.

_____

There are..
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. "spring radish" varieties but they are not as common as the
typical radish.
Most radishes like 60 degree weather and cold snaps will improve their flavor.
Most radishes grown in warm weather will be bitter.

_____

Half of my graden is gone
On May 1st, 2008 DaisyFL says:

Stupid Mexican Iguanas ate my sunflower, sweet potato, pumpkin transplants
and somebody trampled my purple carrots and baby lettuce. If they go after my
watermelons I'm gonna scream!
P.S. Does anyone know if it's too late to plant watermelon in zone 10?

_____

Hmm..
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. are the iguanas wild? In Florida? Or are they pets?
Maybe a fence is in order. Shouldn't need a very high fence to keep the iguanas
out... Wink

_____

Pests
On May 1st, 2008 DaisyFL says:

They were people's pets but they would let them go, now there are tens of
thousands of them in FL.
Won't work. They climb, dig, and swim. sigh.

_____

Also this..
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

This website has a recipe for a garlic spray that you spray the plants with
once a week that is supposed to work:
http://www.animalrightsfl...

_____

Check this out...
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

This website claims:
"Please note that many of our Florida customers with Iguana problems are
having great success with CoyotePee."
http://www.predatorpee.co...
I thought fox/coyote pee as a critter repellent was kind of silly at first but
I've seen two different gardening shows on television that claims it works.
It's a powder in a can that you sprinkle around your garden and/or yard
perimeter. You probably need to resprinkle if it rains.
I was totally unaware of the iguana problem in Florida. Learn something new
everyday... (=

_____

Apparently wolf pee works too
On May 1st, 2008 akak says:

I had a pet wolf until last fall, and curiously I (well, my garden) was
NEVER bothered by hares or moose, unlike others in my area. But he died in
October, and I fear it will be open season on my garden this year.

_____

A full-blooded wolf...
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. as a pet? =P

_____

Yes, Mart --- Dudley the
On May 1st, 2008 akak says:

Yes, Mart --- Dudley the wolf. I called him a "wolf hybrid" in
public, but it was pretty obvious what he was. He was actually quite a good pet
overall, at least as good as any average dog, although he did have his quirks
and wolfy goofiness to deal with. I didn't take him out in public too much,
though, as I obviously did not want to get into any legal hassles, and he drew
too much attention when I did. But I'd take him hiking and camping all the time
--- he really got excited when he saw me take out his backpack!

_____
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:00 am

Was he raised..
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:
.. in captivity?

_____

Yes, my wolf was always
On May 1st, 2008 akak says:

Yes, my wolf was always domesticated --- born and raised in captivity. I
actually "inherited" him from a friend, who brought him up from
Colorado, and who obtained him (quasi-legally) from a breeder in that state.
Admittedly, he was the runt of his litter, and so on the small side for a male
(about 80 pounds), although his frame was not much smaller than average, and
with all the thick fur (especially his winter coat), he looked a lot bulkier
than he really was.
I would attach a photo of him here, but I don't know how to do that.

_____

breakthematrix.com...
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

... allows you to upload pics.
Login or register to post comments

Just
On May 1st, 2008 gavination says:

Just got my backyard tilled up yesterday. Puttin in tomato plants today. Its
my first garden since i was a kid. Never thought it would be so fun and
exciting.

_____

Good exercise too..
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. and I have a theory that working the dirt and pulling all the various
kinds of weeds gets chemicals and nutrients in your body that we need to be
healthy...

_____

38 degrees here-
On April 30th, 2008 CarrotTop says:

that's including wind chill. Needless to say, I'm not out getting my dirt
composted.

_____

Dang...
On April 30th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. my tomato plants are nearly 2.5 ft high. Had to build bamboo trellises
for them today. Pepper plants are two feet high. Bean plants almost a foot
high.
I hate the two months of 100 degree weather down here but I guess it's worth it
for the extended gardening. Wink
Hope you guys get a blast of warm air soon...

_____

Thanks for the sympathy!
On May 1st, 2008 CarrotTop says:

My tomato plants are about 18 inches high under the greenhouse light in the
spare bedroom. I may have to buy bamboo sticks to tie the plants to until I can
get them outside. My sugar snap peas are in the same plight: standing stiffly
upright, their confused tendrils grasping at the air. I'm afraid they will fall
over from lack of support before it warms up outdoors.
Stupid global warming.

_____

Tomato plants ?mine are 3 inches in greenhouse.
On April 30th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

Yeah us too, we are getting a 2 day blizzard . I just covered my apricot ,
peach and pear trees with quilts because they started flowering. Sad
Hmmmm... depressing. Anyone got land for sale in New Mexico????

_____

Our cherry trees'
On May 1st, 2008 CarrotTop says:

blossoms might be starting to open up. Every day I beg them to please,
please, please not be foolish. These trees are way too big for quilts,
unfortunately, since we have nighttime temps of 32 degrees forecast!
At least my daffodils and purple ornamental cabbages are liking the cold air.
This combo garden is the only color in the whole neighborhood.

_____

Poor fruit trees...
On May 1st, 2008 martfuncher says:

=*(

_____

I'm in Upstate N.Y.- Last
On April 30th, 2008 almfree says:

I'm in Upstate N.Y.- Last Sunday I tilled 6 gardens for neighbors and family
using a 3pt hitch 50" tiller. One garden was a 'first timer', two gardens
were the same size as last years garden, and the other three gardens were
DOUBLED in size from what they had last year. So- 50% recognized they wanted
(needed?) a larger yield.

_____

Are...
On April 30th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. ya'll each growing different stuff so you can share? Like a mini-co-op?

Hey Mart,I sent you a
On April 30th, 2008 howard722 says:

Hey Mart,
I sent you a message yesterday, did you get it

______________________________________________

>>>>> Daily Paul Page 2 <<<<< Google
Page 1

Page 1, as retrieved on May 6, 2008
_________________________________________

In the Deep South...
On May 4th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. and similarly warm climates you can plant a second round of tomato's in
late May or even June (zone 8 -- zone 7 might be pushing it).
For more northern climates May-early June is the only window you have...

_____

ME or FL?
On May 4th, 2008 thefreeman says:

Just go to your local veggie garden store and ask them. I just bought 6 -
6" tomato plants for $2.00 as a start. Here in the northeast, the planting
mostly starts this coming weekend.

_____

No, not too late to plant
On May 4th, 2008 Kay says:

Don't know where you live, but May is a perfect month to plant tomatoes and
other heat-loving veggies (corn, squash, etc.). The soil needs to be warm so
everything will grow.

_____

You bet...
On May 4th, 2008 bonnieblue says:

We fully planted our main garden last weekend. This year we put in zucchini,
spaghetti squash, pattypan, eggplant, cucumbers, tomatoes, musk melon, bell
peppers, jalapeno peppers, cayenne peppers, cabbage, radish, onions, lettuce,
garlic and basil. We also added a much smaller herb garden this time around for
things like parsley, sage, chives, scallions, cilantro, rosemary etc. I'll be
finishing up the herb garden today.Let the watering and weeding begin... ;-)
"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you. Then
you win". --Mahatma Gandhi

_____

Nice garden =)
On May 4th, 2008 martfuncher says:

Hmm, what's a "pattypan"? Off to google...
Hehe, pattypan is that ufo shaped squashed: =P
http://en.wikipedia.org/w...

_____

Thanks, we really put alot of effort in each year.
On May 4th, 2008 bonnieblue says:

re: pattypan... Funny looking but tasty... :-)
"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you. Then
you win". --Mahatma Gandhi

_____

I think I'm just gonna
On May 3rd, 2008 sentinel says:

Grow a huge pot pant and get so stoned I forget that the world is dying,
Damn I forgot I don't use drugs Sad Maybe I can learn to.

_____

i have just added
On May 4th, 2008 PietroCappello says:

3 grapevines
1 mulberry tree
a system of grow lights
powered by a microarray wind turbine.
all green baby!

_____

You are growing...
On May 4th, 2008 martfuncher says:

... grapevines and a mulberry tree indoors with grow lights? Or, the grapes
and mulberry are outside and you are growing other stuff with the grow lights?

_____

I defend...
On May 4th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. your right to do that. =P

_____

growing gojis
On May 3rd, 2008 burlington says:

I have to pass on a great source for perennial berries (and other great
edible landscaping plants as well) -- www.onegreenworld.com. The other day I
purchased honey berries, currents, gooseberries, and goji berry plants from
them. I chose these because I live in New England and they are all super hardy.
The goji in particular is a super addition to the garden. It grows 8 - 10 feet
tall with vines up to 20 feet (which makes the plant easy to multiply by
burying) and tolerates drought conditions and is fine with average soil. The
goji berry (just do a google search) is a super nutrient dense food which blows
away all other berries. This particular company stops shipping I think May 10th
---

_____

Yeah goji's sound great
On May 4th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

but on the site it said it was zone 6 for gojis. I am assuming from your
name you are in VT. I grew up in NH and it was Zone 4. Doesn't sound like
goji's will grow there.

_____

Cool!
On May 4th, 2008 martfuncher says:

Great site. I'm saving a link to it.

_____

I'm sorry
On May 3rd, 2008 Enonesoch says:

if this comes across as being rude, but can we kill this post? It is a great
subject for another site, but does it have relevance here? There are pIenty of
ways to chit-chat on the web, let's keep this site focused on Dr. Paul, the
message and the movement that has come to be. I know this will bump it up, for
my sake I hope for the last time. Thanks

_____

Fascism...
On May 4th, 2008 martfuncher says:

"Fascism should rightly be called Corporatism as it is a merger of
state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini - The "Father of
Fascism"
Perhaps THE first line of defense against threats to liberty is the ability of
the People to provide for themselves the basics of existence; food and water
being perhaps the two most imminent basic needs.
Being dependent on corporations for access, manufacture and transportation of
our food poses a great danger to our liberty and freedom. At a whim our
government and corporate masters can cause the grocery stores to be empty in a
single day resulting in us groveling and begging at their feet instead of
resisting their tyranny.
The more of us who have developed the infrastructure and skills to grow our own
food locally the greater our power to resist oppression and the greater our
ability to fight to win our liberty and freedom back.
In general, the food provided in the grocery stores and in the restaurants is
incredibly less nutritious than food grown in one's own gardens from heirloom
and organic seed. Gardening is very good exercise also. Better fed people in
better physical shape have more stamina and their minds work better and are
just more effective in whatever efforts they are engaged in.
Gardening is QUITE apropos to Dr. Paul and what he is trying to accomplish and
gardening strengthens our ability to support him in his efforts.
Any counterpoints? =)
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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:02 am

_____

I'm sure Dr. Paul would
On May 5th, 2008 Boscovius says:

I'm sure Dr. Paul would approve of your retort. I think it's the people who
don't bother to read into the content of this thread, or who have no
appreciation of food that comes from the soil by the careful application of
heart, hand, and mind, who fail to appreciate the bountiful wisdom to be gained
in this forum.
Let's consider Dr. Paul to be the Gardener of the Body Politic.
Things are only impossible until they are not.
-- Jean Luc Picard

_____

Dude...
On May 3rd, 2008 kat says:

If you don't want to participate...Just blow by it...This thread is
important to some of us who want a self sufficient life style..Even though i
hate to garden..I 've learned alot just in case...
Remember...Don't sweat the small stuff.
____________________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Ok...
On May 3rd, 2008 Enonesoch says:

Wink

_____

tomatoes
On May 3rd, 2008 thefreeman says:

I'm putting in a garden again! I haven't for ten years because the
neighbor's trees have been blocking most of the sun in my downtown backyard. I
had an idea. I'm going to the south side of the house, up front. It's in full
view of the sidewalk and just 5' to 30' away from it, but I'm hoping that
people won't pick the veggies before I do. I'm excited!
Still got to get a water faucet out there this week and prepare the soil. I'll
pick up all my favorite plants on sale next weekend.

_____

Get some..
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. rottweilers? Wink
What all are you gonna try to grow?

_____

Woohoo!
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

Looks like the 1,000th post is going to happen today. =)
Thanks everybody!

_____

I hope I win....
On May 3rd, 2008 Kay says:

I really want that Twinkie you promised to the winner!

_____

Hehe..
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. I'm not sure who was 1,000. =P
*hugs@kay*

_____

Dew berries are
On May 3rd, 2008 eastexkid says:

getting ripe and I've already picked about 2 gallons on my property. My corn
is 1 foot and I just put the bean seeds in next to them. I'll be planting the
sqash soon. I have a problem with the armadillos rooting in my corn so I will
be hunting tonight. My turnips look great, I just thinned them and had some nice
greens with my supper and still have a large bag left to finish off. My
watermelons and cantelopes look ok. My purple hulls look great and should start
making in a week or two. I have a lot of okra but they are only about 4 inches
tall now. I will be picking my first banana peppers in couple of days but my
tomatos are running late and no blooms yet. My potatos are lacking so I may dig
up what I have and replant in a different location. Mmmm, cream potatos and
cornbread. ; )
My honey bees have swarmed 4 times now. The last one was real small so I don't
think there will be any more this year. I hived the second swarm in a makeshift
hive I made and am waiting on my new hive kit to arrive. I will be harvesting
my first honey from the original hive in a couple of days.
All in all I would say I'm doing ok. My wife and I went down to the pond and
caught some fish this morning. But I already have a freezer full so I just let
them go until I really need them.
On the down side. I do obviously live in the country and I killed two snakes by
the pond last week and had a runnin with a rattle snake two days ago that was
about 5 - 6 feet long and as big around as my forearm. He was scairy to say the
least, so now it is a rule to carry a gun when anyone goes walking because we
are in snake season. Other than that and the armadillos, life is grand.

_____

Creamed potatoes
On May 3rd, 2008 CarrotTop says:

and cornbread? Never heard of it, but it sounds wonderful. Recipe anyone?
I've also never heard of dewberries, but by the look of them in the photographs
they would make a great syrup to pour over vanilla ice cream.

_____

Cream potatos
On May 5th, 2008 eastexkid says:

First: Go out and dig a few new potatoes from each plant until you have a
nice bunch. These are small dime to quarter/half dollar sized babies and taste
MUCH better than cubing full grown potatoes. But you can cube if need be.
Second: Boil the new potatoes whole until they are just about done.
Third: Drain the water and add milk until the potatoes are just covered. Or you
could leave some water and add canned milk to make the same consistancy. Then
add butter/margerine depending on how much you are cooking. I like a lot of
butter. ; ) Heat back up on stove.
Fourth: Add a little corn/potatoe starch OR flour. Just enough to thicken a
little. And salt and pepper to taste.
You may have to play with this recipe a little but this is the jest of it.
I like to ladel it over my buttered cornbread. I had some last night with my
steak. It's hard to stop eating.
Remember, just take a few new potatoes from each plant and recover the roots.
This will not hurt your potatoe plants and will help the remaining potatoes to
grow larger. Also, these new potatoes have a thin red skin that doesn't have to
be removed, just wash them off.
Enjoy.
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Dewberries here too... =)
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

I've been eating a couple of cup fulls of dewberries everyday (south
Missippi).
From watching the weather map yesterday it looks like you guys got flooded. We
got plenty of rain here too, enough to keep from watering for a week, but
nothing like what the map showed you guys getting...

_____

Okay Mart...
On May 3rd, 2008 kat says:

I have a question for you...There are berries growing wild all over the
place...Intially they are red and then turn dark purple/black..the vines are
covered in thick red thorns...
I was always taught these were blackberries...but people here in Mississippi
say they're elderberries...Help?
_______________________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

From my understanding...
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. they are "dewberries". also known as "wild
blackberries".
They tend to be a little more tart and are not as firm as cultivated
blackberries (they fall apart and get a staining juice on your fingers really
easy) but they are very very healthy for you.
I mostly eat them raw and sometimes throw them into my juicer, although the
little seeds can funk up the juicer requiring extra cleaning.
I don't think they are "elderberries". Pics of elderberries:
http://images.google.com/...
Pics of dewberries:
http://images.google.com/...

_____

Thanks Mart.!!!
On May 3rd, 2008 kat says:

I threw a couple of bags of them in my freezer,,,Is this okay, you think?..
Also before I did..I purged them in salt water...I remember my mother doing
this when we picked them as kids in Louisiana and small worms coming out...Just
some advice..
-----------------------------------------------------
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Hmm..
On May 4th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. i've been eating them raw straight off the bramble since I was a kid. I'm
sure i've eaten a few bugs along the way. Mmm, protein... =)

_____

Oh, the worms...
On May 3rd, 2008 sistagirl86 says:

you're bring back memories from childhood....But I don't remember them on
the dewberries; something else where we dipped them into water....I just don't
remember what it was. Will try to remember and post it.
Also, I remember my mom freezing berries when she didn't have time to make
jelly right away. I don't know how long they were frozen, but I sure don't
remember any "bad" dewberry jelly! You will probably be fine in
freezing them,
I realize your question was directed at Mart...Hope I'm not stepping on toes by
answering.

_____

The dewberries have..
On May 4th, 2008 martfuncher says:

... little hairs all over them. Perhaps she was trying to remove the hairs
or grit or tiny dried pieces of other plants?
I suppose when I eat the berries raw straight off the bramble I am
inadvertently eating a few little bugs now and then but bugs parts are in the
cereals and canned veggies from the store and I figure the bugs are safer then
eating produce that has been dunked in pesticides and bathed in radiation.
With regards to questions being directed, since this an open forum please feel
free to comment on any comment. =)
*hugs@sistagirl*

_____

No not really,
On May 3rd, 2008 eastexkid says:

we caught the southern tip of the storm. I'm south of Shreveport. Lots of
thunder and lightening but just a decent amount of rain. It's beautiful today.

_____

Berries getting ripe, NOW?
On May 3rd, 2008 akak says:

Berries getting ripe, NOW? Damn, you must have a LONG growing season! When
does it start ---- January?
But, of course I am at the other extreme of the country, climatically. The
birch trees still have not started to leaf out yet, and I still have snow in my
yard. The first berries we can expect here are usually ripe around the middle
of July --- no dewberries, though (my great uncle in Alabama used to make
really good dewberry wine).

_____

Dewberries...
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. ripen earlier than most cultivated blackberries. They are wild....

_____

Started getting ripe
On May 3rd, 2008 eastexkid says:

about 5 days ago here in northwest Louisiana. I've been picking a little
every day. I was thinking of making jelly/jam but my wife did suggest making
wine. I used to make muskidime wine when I was younger and I think I still know
how.

_____

Square foot gardening??
On May 3rd, 2008 dom7p says:

Has anyone tried square foot gardening? You grow your food in 12x12 in
boxes. The seeds are not planted directly in the ground. And is anyone using
composting with worms????? I just bought a book and will be starting all of
this within the next 2 weeks.
Ron Paul is the man!!!! Pres. 2008

_____
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:04 am

Square foot gardens
On May 3rd, 2008 CarrotTop says:

We have made two out of some scrap 2 by 12's, that are 4 by 4. It is too
cold here yet to plant anything in them, but I'm guessing there will be 90%
less weeding, but they will use more water. I like the less weeding idea.
Do you think that the soil could be 1 part each, compost, peat moss, and
perlite, like potting soil, or would you leave out the perlite, and add a bit
of dirt?

_____

Composting with worms
On May 3rd, 2008 CarrotTop says:

The worms that make compost the fastest are the little red ones.
Nightcrawlers are a lot slower at it. We have two big, blue, 8 by 4 fiberglass
bins that were made just for composting worms. They have a heating element that
keeps everything going full speed all year around. Purchased new they are
horribly expensive, but we found slightly used ones in the Thrifty Nickel newspaper
for 75% off. They work really well, and the worms multiply rapidly.
No matter what sort of container you use, you could end up selling composting
worms, in addition to making compost for your gardens, if you can keep them
warm, and laying eggs all year. Worm castings are probably as good a fertilizer
as the water from the bottom of fish tanks that someone else mentioned. Also
the water that collects in the tray under the worm bed after you water it, is
very good for plants.
Feeding worms is really easy, since they, like pigs, aren't picky eaters. We
save all of our fruit and vegetable scraps, and even old flour or boiled rice
that didn't get eaten, stuff it in the blender, add water, and voila, worm
food. Just pour it on the top of the worm bed. It is kinda gross to see
thousands of worms surrounding the slop, eating.

_____

Regarding worms... Last week
On May 3rd, 2008 john2k says:

Regarding worms... Last week I walked around our property seeing what worms
I could find (11) and setup a little worm farm for them. Then yesterday I went
fishing and had bought some canadian night crawlers for bait... had 8 left so
added them to the worm box.
This is really just a little experiment for me at this point.
I had plans to get a compost pile going this year and stumbles across
vermiculture (worm composting). It looks much better than regular composting.
I'm probably going to do it, but will need to purchase a quantity of worms to
get started as I don't think the 20 or so worms will be enough to really do any
significant composting.

_____

Fish Water
On May 2nd, 2008 JohnFromChicago says:

I have two big tiger oscars and a plecostumus in a 110 tank. I I feed them
live food about once a week. I clean the tank once a month by siphoning 10
gallons off the bottom of the tank. This is the best water you could possibly
use on your garden. If you garden, I would strongly recommend getting a fish
tank.
I've only got a small space, so I'm doing a few jalapenos, radishes, onions,
and a tomato.
http://www.youtube.com/pr...

_____

You are sooooo.....
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

correct!
_________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Okay..This is off topic in a way..
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

But it may help some people..
I own a pet store and my friend Rob was getting his home in the country broken
into everytime he went to work in New Orleans...Meth heads more than
likely...What ever they couldn't steal, they would trash and he has been trying
to store food and start gardens..They poisoned his dogs...and he really didn't
know what to do since he was temporarily laid off and couldn't afford to move
anywhere...
Twice his food storage area was found and destroyed out of maliciousness even
though it was hidden.
So in talking one day I decided to help him out ...I sold him 30 tarantulas and
had him put them with his stored food to free roam...
His house was broken into...ONCE...and nothing was touched...a few months later
and not one incident...Guess they work..
He also told me today that he has had not one pest or insect problem since
introducing them..
Maybe instead of guns and dogs we could just use these little critters!
-------------------------------------------
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Would tarantulas eat
On May 3rd, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

aphids? I have a greenhouse/sunroom and I have been having problems with
aphids and the usual organic things don't seem to be working. Of course my 13
year old is arachnaphobic. That would be a problem, but then again, he never works
in my greenhouse. Smile

_____

How much..
On May 2nd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. are tarantulas going for these days?
*hugs@kat*

_____

A Big Tarantula hug right back!
On May 2nd, 2008 kat says:

I gave them to him at cost...Really? Are you interested? I'm your girl !
I'll even throw in a couple of scorpions.for fun!
_____________________________
"I have once heard that the ability to resist temptation is the truest
measure of a mans character."
Dustin Hoffman to Steve McQueen
"Papillion"

_____

Kat, I wonder about you!
On May 3rd, 2008 akak says:

So Kat, you keep tarantulas, and snakes, and scorpions all running around
your house ---- are you Satan's mistress? Would the pungent whiff of burning
brimstone greet me at your door? Do the neighbors' children "somehow"
never come around on Halloween? (or even worse, "disappear" when they
do?)
Inquiring minds want to know!

_____

Can I..
On May 3rd, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. feed the scorpions to the tarantula? =)
If I did get a tarantula(s) it would be for a pet...

_____

Kat, so do they roam free
On May 2nd, 2008 akak says:

Kat, so do they roam free through the WHOLE HOUSE?! I'm not one of those
fraidy-scared-of-miniscule-spiders people, but I don't think even I would want
one or several of those things crawling on me in bed!

______________________________________________

>>>>> Daily Paul Page 3 <<<<<
Google Page 2

Page 2, as retrieved on May 3, 2008
______________________________________________

What all..
On April 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. did you get?

_____

OMG about $70 worth/tons of veggie seeds
On April 29th, 2008 Susan says:

Heirloom tomato,beans, lettuce, raddish, carrot, squash, eggplant and
various herbs. I got several varieties of each so I can see what I like best.

_____

Sound like...
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. you may be giving alot of food away. =P

_____

Seeds
On April 28th, 2008 Susan says:

What's going on with the system?

_____

Seeds
On April 28th, 2008 Susan says:

LOL

_____

Seeds
On April 28th, 2008 Susan says:

Weird posted three times?

_____

Seeds
On April 28th, 2008 Susan says:

SNAFU triple post

_____

Pentuple post!
On April 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

=P
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Our potatoes are growing fast..
On April 27th, 2008 Tessie101 says:

and we have fresh strawberries, and now radishes. Our peppers, tomotoes, and
zuccini are growing fast too. I can't wait for the corn, and carrots. Oh, and
the melons seem to be doing very well. I love fresh produce. We happen to be
quite lucky, we have an orange, plum, apple, and cherry tree. If our prices for
food continue to go up, at least we will have fresh fruit.

_____

My watermelons..
On April 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. were slow starters for some reason. They just had the two oval starter
leaves on them but one plant this sunday produced an actual watermelon leaf
looking leaf. (=
My four kinds of beans/peas are going like gangbusters. My sunflowers too..

_____

sounds very nice, abundant, and with orange trees
On April 27th, 2008 cw canadian says:

and melons, almost tropical. Yum
Nothing is nicer than a plum tree. I used sit under ours as a kid and eat and
eat and eat and eat....
but I bet you wish you could have lots of snow, hail and cold weather
well into spring :-/
I did buy my dehydrator today YEAH so I will have fruit and vegies year round
so long as I get busy and dry them. There are lots of jerky recipes with it
too.

_____

We love our dehydrators.
On April 29th, 2008 CarrotTop says:

They have been humming for the past six weeks, and I now have a big bucket
of apple slices, and am close to the same for pineapples, pears, and plums.
When that is finished, there will be peaches, strawberries, and cherries. In
the past our dried fruit has lasted for years.
The vegies from the victory garden will have their turns in the dehydrator
later in the summer. Jerky happens when I find quality beef on sale.
If you buy a couple of extra trays for your machine, the process will go
faster.

_____

Did you get an excalibur?
On April 29th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

I hear that is the best. but "sigh", we only have a little solar
for power, so have to air dry ours, cept jerky, which hangs over the woodstove
(done when it is cold out). If you live in a dry climate like the west, you can
use one put out called "the pantrie" Lehmans sells it. I use it all
the time I hang it on my porch which is open to the wind, out of the sun, and
it works great. I also make jerky in my outdoor wood fired clay/brick bread
oven, the day after I bake bread. It sucks the water out of anything, including
vegs. Is there a way for anyone to embed a picture on here? Anyone can make one
of these clay ovens from dirt and stones, and you can bake bread and pizza,
baked beans and dehydrate anything all in one firing of junk firewood.

_____
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:06 am

I want..
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. a wood-fired oven. =)
On a similar topic, what do you call the style of cooking where you build a
fire in a pit then you put cast iron cooking containers directly down in the
embers and cover the containers with embers? I can't think of the name of that
for anything. It's a frontier tradition type thing...

_____

Try this...mmmm
On April 29th, 2008 pegarizona says:

_____

Dutch oven!
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

*hugs@peg*
That's what I have been trying to think of for like two weeks now! =P
Thanks...

_____

Your welcome...
On April 30th, 2008 pegarizona says:

You must try the coke cake…Simple and very good, my friends gave me the
loving name of camp B.... rymes with witch, after eating it and request it all
the time.
Ingredients:
• 2 cans cherry pie filling
• 1 can Coke
• 1 chocolate cake mix
Directions:
Pour pie filling in the bottom of a 12" Dutch Oven. Cover evenly with cake
mix and pour a Coke on top. Do not stir. Bake in 350 degree coals for about 35
minutes or until cake appears to be done.

_____

Fire Pit Cooking
On April 29th, 2008 Kay says:

Don't know if there's another name for it. Reminds me of all those foil
dinners my boys used to cook for Boy Scouts. Just wrap up the meat, veggies,
spices, etc., in heavy duty foil and throw in the fire until done. They're
actually pretty good.

_____

I used..
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. to go backpacking in cold weather alot in my younger days and I would
make a couple tin foil packs like that with beef tips, potato and onions with
seasonings in addition to the standard freeze-dried meals. Since when
backpacking you carry everything on your back, my fellow backpackers would tell
me it weighed too much and suggest that I not take them. But, they would be
VERY jealous and offering money for my treats when I pulled my tin foil
packages from the camp fire... =)
*hugs@kay*

_____

Hey Mart, I do that too! Of
On April 29th, 2008 akak says:

Hey Mart, I do that too! Of course, living in Michigan and now Alaska, the
majority of the weather is cold weather. Yeah, I griped to myself about the
little extra weight, but there is nothing like enjoying paella with fresh
chorizo, shrimp and chicken on the frozen shore of Lake Superior on New Year's
Eve, with key lime pie for dessert! (and a bottle of Sauterne)

_____

Somehow this doesn't sound like
On April 29th, 2008 Kay says:

Boy Scout chow! I'd bet they'd have had a larger troop if you'd been in
charge of the cooking!

_____

I figure going camping is no
On April 29th, 2008 akak says:

I figure going camping is no reason to eat crap --- just the opposite!

_____

If you...
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. dehydrate without heat the result lasts MUCH longer and tastes better.
You can do it with a box fan and paper a/c filters as described here:
http://www.foodnetwork.co...

_____

Ah! Potted potatoes! Why didn't I think of that?
On April 27th, 2008 cw canadian says:

here is a great article on the nutritous potato and some good history too
Mr. Potato Heads Off Food Crisis
By Mary Sparrowdancer
© Copyright 2008 4-27-8
Link
http://www.rense.com/gene...

_____

Good article...
On April 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

I'm planting some taters tomorrow. Gonna throw a few on the ground and pile
up some dirt and mulch on them and keep making the pile bigger. Gonna use some
2 foot wide plastic hoops... =)

_____

I went out this afternoon and got my potato planters...
On April 27th, 2008 cw canadian says:

soil and I already have organic sprouting potatoes to cut up
AAhhh gardening is so easy..

_____

Last week I was at Home
On April 26th, 2008 john2k says:

Last week I was at Home Depot and saw that they had quite a supply of seeds,
probably a few thousand packets. I was there today again and asked where the
seed displays were moved to as they were gone. I was told that they were sold
out.... now that has me wondering if it is normal for Home Depot to be
completely sold out of seeds or if them selling out has something to do with
the food shortages and people getting prepared...

_____

I think..
On April 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. there is an upsurge in people gardening. I keep coming across people
locally who are gardening and either haven't ever done it before or it's been a
long time.
People who normally aren't worried about things are worried. At our local
Wal-Mart all the departments seem dead except for groceries, pharmacy and
garden center.
My towns locally owned farm and garden centers were selling out of vegetable
plants on a daily basis at spring peak planting a couple of weeks ago. At one
center the sales people were saying how they've never seen it like this.
I think people are waking up to our new reality and shifting priorities and
gears...

_____

Same experience here.
On April 27th, 2008 sistagirl86 says:

Very few seeds left anywhere (except for flower seeds I've never heard of
anyway) at places like W-Mart, Home Depot and Tractor Supply.
I'm one of those that's always had a small garden; it's larger this year and
we're expanding it still. I've already purchased the seeds for the fall garden;
don't want to take a chance on missing out on my faves.
With food & gas prices continuing to climb, it's really starting to hit people
in their checkbooks. Now, here in the hot/humid south, we're getting ready to
face huge elec bills as we start running our A/Cs. Even the sheeple know
something's not right.....I hope they start to take a look at the real issues
rather than just expect "the government" to "fix" things; I
don't think we can take many more of the gov't fixes.
I'm actually glad to see so many people gardening for the first time.....No
matter what their reason. Only good can come of it whether it's from the
exercise they'll get, the health benefits of eating fresh produce, helping
balance their own household budgets, or getting ready for hard times. All good
reasons and good news. The only downside is that I did not buy some of my
favorite seeds/plants early enough and had to take "leftover" stock.

_____

I live..
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. in a rural area with about 1 house for every 4-10 acres and I'm trying to
get everybody together to do a mini-co-op type thing where we share and trade
our crops. =)
I'm also researching edible flowers to put in soups and salads. My property has
several rose bushes that were here when I bought the place and I've tried them
in soups and salads already and they are supposebly really good for you and
they actually taste ok...

_____

sunny florida
On April 25th, 2008 Pdubya says:

the yellow zuchini and purple pole beans are kickin.
the two types of tomato are coming along
spices, check
white eggplant, check
pablano peppers, check
swiss chard, check
figs, plums, loquat, kumquat, watermelon.
all are heirloom, except loquat. www.seedsaver.org

_____

Sounds tasty..
On April 26th, 2008 martfuncher says:
=)

_____

Whew!
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

I worked 10 hours today clearing bamboo, cutting down giant 12 ft high
azalea bushes (they'll grow back), tilling two new garden plots, and burning a
ginormous pile of brush and tree limbs.
I'm whooped... =P

_____

Honey bees
On April 25th, 2008 eastexkid says:

I am happy to report that my honey bees just swarmed this morning and it was
an awesome sight. I hived these bees out of my wall last year without any prior
beekeeping knowledge and they have been doing great. This is probably why my
plants are looking so well this year.
Anyway, I went out this morning and there were a bunch clustered outside the
hive. I went inside to check my book "The Hive and the Honeybee" and
when I went back out everything looked normal. As I sat in my chair watching
them go in and out I heard a loud swarm and looked above my head to see a huge
cluster breaking up on a limb. They were a massive swarm that moved north over
my house and towards the woods and out of sight. I was kinda sad but happy that
my hive was reproducing.
Now my hive is carrying on with business as usual and I should still be able to
get my first honey crop soon. Not to mention the aid they should give to my
garden. I'm so glad I decided to hive these bees instead of exterminating them
as it has been a wonderful experience.

_____

When our bees swarmed
On April 27th, 2008 CarrotTop says:

it looked like a tornado over the hive. Tens of thousands of bees zinging
round and round ( I don't know how they manage to pull to many G's). The queen
finally lit on the branch of a large juniper near the hive, and all the bees
formed a clump around her. Husband suited up and placed a cardboard box under
the clump. Then he quickly sprayed down the clump with thick sugar water which
caused the whole thing to fall into the box (being drenched with sugar water
prevents bees from flying). Then he dumped the bees back in the hive, where
they decided to stay and clean each other off.
That clump of bees weighed over 10 pounds.

_____

Why dump them back into the
On April 27th, 2008 john2k says:

Why dump them back into the hive? As far as I understand, every so often the
current queen will leave the hive along with maybe 50% or so of the bees. They
will establish a new colony elsewhere while your hive will get a new queen.

_____

I wish...
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

... I coulda been there to see the bees take off. =)

_____

This is wonderful news
On April 25th, 2008 Kay says:

I can't believe people would destroy honey bees. They're having a hard time
surviving now anyway. You did the best thing and they should really help your
garden. I have neighbors who have a couple of hives, so we get to take
advantage of that.

_____
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:16 am

We're using RonPaulians.com
On April 25th, 2008 RonPaulians.com says:

We're using RonPaulians.com to get organized for the March and State
actions. Please spread the word Smile
Very easy to use.
LETS GET ORGANIZED!!!
Be sure to put your profile on www.RonPaulians.com !!!
A MySpace JUST for Ron Paul supporters with profiles, photo albums, chat,
classifieds, events, blogs and more. Add video/music widgets etc.
Tell all Ron Paulians!!! Smile

_____

I don't have time
On April 24th, 2008 kat says:

to go through this gigantic thread...
But has the subject of growing mushrooms been brought up here?
Anyone know how or where to get stuff to do this?

_____

great sources
On April 25th, 2008 Pdubya says:

http://www.mushroompeople...
www.thefarm.org
not sure which clime you are in, but would suggest the dowel method for
shiitake into logs, soaked initially and left outdoors with shade and some
watering.
i'm in florida and can grow a short season of one type of shiitake and a long
season of another strain.
equipment needed
oak logs, 4' x 5"dia
drill with 1/2 to 3/8" bit
a place to "stack" the logs or teepee them
ideally, a soaking vat for icewater and innoculated logs
hammer
dowels innoculated with mycelium
hotplate
cheesewax
pan for wax
paintbrush for hot wax
attention to cleanliness
beer
p.s. good shiitakes go for about $9.00/lb

_____

Here's...
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. the best web link i've ever found on growing mushrooms:
http://www.motherearthnew...
At the end of the article is a list of really good internet resources.
Growing mushrooms is kind of weird and the way you grow each of the various
kinds can be very different. Some of them grow on logs you keep in the shade in
the woods, some you can grow in a box in rice, some you can grow in glass jar,
some you can grow in a plastic container in your frig,etc.
I'm gonna take a stab at shittake and maitake mushrooms. Both of them are
supposed to build and maintain your immune system and both grow on fresh cut
logs in shady woods.
=)

_____

Hey Mart...
On April 25th, 2008 kat says:

Thanks!....I remember seeing a mushroom farm where they were grown in
plastic containers in a garage..looked so easy...I have the worst time with
plants...so I thought I could just concentrate on one or two things rather than
trying to strangle my luck with too much variety.

_____

From what I understand...
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. once you get the mushrooms going on the logs they pretty much take care
of themselves. You just go pick'em now and then and after a couple years start
some new logs.
You drill several holes in a freshly cut log, insert "mothers" in
theholes and then seal off with wax, then stick the log in the shade.
I think a kit with the "mothers" is like $30...
(=

_____

(Scratching my head)
On April 25th, 2008 kat says:

Where do you find the time to learn/know/do all this stuff? Amazing. You're
a walking botanist encyclopedia!

_____

Actually..
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. I'm just handy with google and know very little. Also, I've been talking
to old people I know that are good long-time gardeners/farmers. Bought a few
used books last year on Amazon... Wink

_____

for legal mushrooms,
On April 25th, 2008 e_goldstein says:

you may want to try these guys.
http://www2.mailordercent...

_____

Thank you all my mushroom friends...
On April 27th, 2008 kat says:

For all your mushroom links...This is gonna be fun!

_____

I hate to be a mushroom
On April 25th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

I hate to be a mushroom naysayer, but mushrooms are among the lowest calorie
foods you can grow, and in a famine, I'm not sure you really want to grow diet
food. I'd think high calorie vegetables like potatoes, corn, and sweet potatoes
would be better, along with vitamin-packed produce like tomatoes and yellow
squash.
That's just my opinion, though--I'm sure fresh-picked mushrooms add a lot to
the table, and they do grow in the shade.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Health benefits of two mushrooms...
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

According to Kenneth Jones in Shiitake: The Healing Mushroom , Shiitake
provides noteworthy benefits for ulcers, high or low blood pressure, liver
problems, allergies and autoimmune diseases. A 1980 study found that a virus in
shiitake mushrooms could produce interferon, effective in treating cancer. Shiitake
(Lentinus Edodes) is the second most commonly produced mushroom in the world
because of having both medicinal and food value. It is a flesh, gilled mushroom
that grows on wood. When eaten, it yields 26% protein by dry weight,
carbohydrates, fiber, linoleic acid, vitamins B2, C and D, ergosterol and
possesses abundant quantities of calcium, phosphorus, potassium, iron and all
the essential amino acids needed in our diet. It has been used to treat
nutritional deficiencies and liver ailments.
According to Maitake: King of Mushrooms , by Shari Lieberman, Ph.D. and Ken
Babel, C.N., its polysaccharide compound, beta 1,6 glucan, "is recognized
by researchers as the most effective active agent stimulating cellular immune
responses." Harry Preuss and Sensuke Konno, Ph.D., authors of Maitake
Magic, say that studies show Maitake (Grifola Frondosa) can hamper growth and
spread of cancer cells, protect normal cells from environmental carcinogens,
reduce side effects of and augment chemotherapy, stimulate anti-tumor and
anti-microbial activity, and help to halt HIV proliferation. The National
Cancer Institute declared Maitake more powerful than AZT, with no toxic side
effects. Those with high blood pressure can expect a gradual decrease and
Maitake also reduces blood and liver cholesterol and triglycerides, thus
reducing risk of stroke and heart disease.
http://www.fungusamongus....
(read more about health benefits of other mushrooms there too...)

______________________________________________

>>>>> Daily Paul Page 4 <<<<< Google
Page 3

Page 3, as retrieved on May 4, 2008

______________________________________________

Pentuple post!
On April 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

=P

_____

Our potatoes are growing fast..
On April 27th, 2008 Tessie101 says:

and we have fresh strawberries, and now radishes. Our peppers, tomotoes, and
zuccini are growing fast too. I can't wait for the corn, and carrots. Oh, and
the melons seem to be doing very well. I love fresh produce. We happen to be
quite lucky, we have an orange, plum, apple, and cherry tree. If our prices for
food continue to go up, at least we will have fresh fruit.

_____

My watermelons..
On April 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. were slow starters for some reason. They just had the two oval starter
leaves on them but one plant this sunday produced an actual watermelon leaf
looking leaf. (=
My four kinds of beans/peas are going like gangbusters. My sunflowers too..

_____

sounds very nice, abundant, and with orange trees
On April 27th, 2008 cw canadian says:

and melons, almost tropical. Yum
Nothing is nicer than a plum tree. I used sit under ours as a kid and eat and
eat and eat and eat....
but I bet you wish you could have lots of snow, hail and cold weather
well into spring :-/
I did buy my dehydrator today YEAH so I will have fruit and vegies year round
so long as I get busy and dry them. There are lots of jerky recipes with it
too.

_____

We love our dehydrators.
On April 29th, 2008 CarrotTop says:

They have been humming for the past six weeks, and I now have a big bucket
of apple slices, and am close to the same for pineapples, pears, and plums.
When that is finished, there will be peaches, strawberries, and cherries. In
the past our dried fruit has lasted for years.
The vegies from the victory garden will have their turns in the dehydrator
later in the summer. Jerky happens when I find quality beef on sale.
If you buy a couple of extra trays for your machine, the process will go
faster.

_____

Did you get an excalibur?
On April 29th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

I hear that is the best. but "sigh", we only have a little solar
for power, so have to air dry ours, cept jerky, which hangs over the woodstove
(done when it is cold out). If you live in a dry climate like the west, you can
use one put out called "the pantrie" Lehmans sells it. I use it all
the time I hang it on my porch which is open to the wind, out of the sun, and
it works great. I also make jerky in my outdoor wood fired clay/brick bread
oven, the day after I bake bread. It sucks the water out of anything, including
vegs. Is there a way for anyone to embed a picture on here? Anyone can make one
of these clay ovens from dirt and stones, and you can bake bread and pizza,
baked beans and dehydrate anything all in one firing of junk firewood.

_____

I want..
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. a wood-fired oven. =)
On a similar topic, what do you call the style of cooking where you build a
fire in a pit then you put cast iron cooking containers directly down in the
embers and cover the containers with embers? I can't think of the name of that
for anything. It's a frontier tradition type thing...

_____

Try this...mmmm
On April 29th, 2008 pegarizona says:

http://www.mydutchoven.co...

_____

Dutch oven!
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

*hugs@peg*
That's what I have been trying to think of for like two weeks now! =P
Thanks...

_____

Your welcome...
On April 30th, 2008 pegarizona says:

You must try the coke cake…Simple and very good, my friends gave me the
loving name of camp B.... rymes with witch, after eating it and request it all
the time.
Ingredients:
• 2 cans cherry pie filling
• 1 can Coke
• 1 chocolate cake mix
Directions:
Pour pie filling in the bottom of a 12" Dutch Oven. Cover evenly with cake
mix and pour a Coke on top. Do not stir. Bake in 350 degree coals for about 35
minutes or until cake appears to be done.
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:17 am

_____

Fire Pit Cooking
On April 29th, 2008 Kay says:

Don't know if there's another name for it. Reminds me of all those foil
dinners my boys used to cook for Boy Scouts. Just wrap up the meat, veggies,
spices, etc., in heavy duty foil and throw in the fire until done. They're
actually pretty good.

_____

I used..
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. to go backpacking in cold weather alot in my younger days and I would
make a couple tin foil packs like that with beef tips, potato and onions with
seasonings in addition to the standard freeze-dried meals. Since when
backpacking you carry everything on your back, my fellow backpackers would tell
me it weighed too much and suggest that I not take them. But, they would be
VERY jealous and offering money for my treats when I pulled my tin foil
packages from the camp fire... =)
*hugs@kay*

_____

Hey Mart, I do that too! Of
On April 29th, 2008 akak says:

Hey Mart, I do that too! Of course, living in Michigan and now Alaska, the
majority of the weather is cold weather. Yeah, I griped to myself about the
little extra weight, but there is nothing like enjoying paella with fresh
chorizo, shrimp and chicken on the frozen shore of Lake Superior on New Year's
Eve, with key lime pie for dessert! (and a bottle of Sauterne)

_____

Somehow this doesn't sound like
On April 29th, 2008 Kay says:

Boy Scout chow! I'd bet they'd have had a larger troop if you'd been in
charge of the cooking!

_____

I figure going camping is no
On April 29th, 2008 akak says:

I figure going camping is no reason to eat crap --- just the opposite!

_____

If you...
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. dehydrate without heat the result lasts MUCH longer and tastes better.
You can do it with a box fan and paper a/c filters as described here:
http://www.foodnetwork.co...

_____

Ah! Potted potatoes! Why didn't I think of that?
On April 27th, 2008 cw canadian says:

here is a great article on the nutritous potato and some good history too
Mr. Potato Heads Off Food Crisis
By Mary Sparrowdancer
© Copyright 2008 4-27-8
Link
http://www.rense.com/gene...

_____

Good article...
On April 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

I'm planting some taters tomorrow. Gonna throw a few on the ground and pile
up some dirt and mulch on them and keep making the pile bigger. Gonna use some
2 foot wide plastic hoops... =)

_____

I went out this afternoon and got my potato planters...
On April 27th, 2008 cw canadian says:

soil and I already have organic sprouting potatoes to cut up
AAhhh gardening is so easy..

_____

Last week I was at Home
On April 26th, 2008 john2k says:

Last week I was at Home Depot and saw that they had quite a supply of seeds,
probably a few thousand packets. I was there today again and asked where the seed
displays were moved to as they were gone. I was told that they were sold
out.... now that has me wondering if it is normal for Home Depot to be
completely sold out of seeds or if them selling out has something to do with
the food shortages and people getting prepared...

_____

I think..
On April 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. there is an upsurge in people gardening. I keep coming across people
locally who are gardening and either haven't ever done it before or it's been a
long time.
People who normally aren't worried about things are worried. At our local
Wal-Mart all the departments seem dead except for groceries, pharmacy and
garden center.
My towns locally owned farm and garden centers were selling out of vegetable
plants on a daily basis at spring peak planting a couple of weeks ago. At one
center the sales people were saying how they've never seen it like this.
I think people are waking up to our new reality and shifting priorities and
gears...

_____

Same experience here.
On April 27th, 2008 sistagirl86 says:

Very few seeds left anywhere (except for flower seeds I've never heard of
anyway) at places like W-Mart, Home Depot and Tractor Supply.
I'm one of those that's always had a small garden; it's larger this year and
we're expanding it still. I've already purchased the seeds for the fall garden;
don't want to take a chance on missing out on my faves.
With food & gas prices continuing to climb, it's really starting to hit
people in their checkbooks. Now, here in the hot/humid south, we're getting
ready to face huge elec bills as we start running our A/Cs. Even the sheeple
know something's not right.....I hope they start to take a look at the real
issues rather than just expect "the government" to "fix"
things; I don't think we can take many more of the gov't fixes.
I'm actually glad to see so many people gardening for the first time.....No
matter what their reason. Only good can come of it whether it's from the
exercise they'll get, the health benefits of eating fresh produce, helping
balance their own household budgets, or getting ready for hard times. All good
reasons and good news. The only downside is that I did not buy some of my
favorite seeds/plants early enough and had to take "leftover" stock.

_____

I live..
On April 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. in a rural area with about 1 house for every 4-10 acres and I'm trying to
get everybody together to do a mini-co-op type thing where we share and trade
our crops. =)
I'm also researching edible flowers to put in soups and salads. My property has
several rose bushes that were here when I bought the place and I've tried them
in soups and salads already and they are supposebly really good for you and
they actually taste ok...

_____

sunny florida
On April 25th, 2008 Pdubya says:

the yellow zuchini and purple pole beans are kickin.
the two types of tomato are coming along
spices, check
white eggplant, check
pablano peppers, check
swiss chard, check
figs, plums, loquat, kumquat, watermelon.
all are heirloom, except loquat. www.seedsaver.org

_____

Sounds tasty..
On April 26th, 2008 martfuncher says:

=)

_____

Whew!
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

I worked 10 hours today clearing bamboo, cutting down giant 12 ft high
azalea bushes (they'll grow back), tilling two new garden plots, and burning a
ginormous pile of brush and tree limbs.
I'm whooped... =P

_____

Honey bees
On April 25th, 2008 eastexkid says:

I am happy to report that my honey bees just swarmed this morning and it was
an awesome sight. I hived these bees out of my wall last year without any prior
beekeeping knowledge and they have been doing great. This is probably why my
plants are looking so well this year.
Anyway, I went out this morning and there were a bunch clustered outside the
hive. I went inside to check my book "The Hive and the Honeybee" and
when I went back out everything looked normal. As I sat in my chair watching
them go in and out I heard a loud swarm and looked above my head to see a huge
cluster breaking up on a limb. They were a massive swarm that moved north over
my house and towards the woods and out of sight. I was kinda sad but happy that
my hive was reproducing.
Now my hive is carrying on with business as usual and I should still be able to
get my first honey crop soon. Not to mention the aid they should give to my
garden. I'm so glad I decided to hive these bees instead of exterminating them
as it has been a wonderful experience.

_____

When our bees swarmed
On April 27th, 2008 CarrotTop says:

it looked like a tornado over the hive. Tens of thousands of bees zinging
round and round ( I don't know how they manage to pull to many G's). The queen
finally lit on the branch of a large juniper near the hive, and all the bees
formed a clump around her. Husband suited up and placed a cardboard box under
the clump. Then he quickly sprayed down the clump with thick sugar water which
caused the whole thing to fall into the box (being drenched with sugar water
prevents bees from flying). Then he dumped the bees back in the hive, where
they decided to stay and clean each other off.
That clump of bees weighed over 10 pounds.

_____

Why dump them back into the
On April 27th, 2008 john2k says:

Why dump them back into the hive? As far as I understand, every so often the
current queen will leave the hive along with maybe 50% or so of the bees. They
will establish a new colony elsewhere while your hive will get a new queen.

_____

I wish...
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

... I coulda been there to see the bees take off. =)

_____

This is wonderful news
On April 25th, 2008 Kay says:

I can't believe people would destroy honey bees. They're having a hard time
surviving now anyway. You did the best thing and they should really help your
garden. I have neighbors who have a couple of hives, so we get to take
advantage of that.

_____

We're using RonPaulians.com
On April 25th, 2008 RonPaulians.com says:

We're using RonPaulians.com to get organized for the March and State
actions. Please spread the word Smile
Very easy to use.
LETS GET ORGANIZED!!!
Be sure to put your profile on www.RonPaulians.com !!!
A MySpace JUST for Ron Paul supporters with profiles, photo albums, chat,
classifieds, events, blogs and more. Add video/music widgets etc.
Tell all Ron Paulians!!! Smile

_____

I don't have time
On April 24th, 2008 kat says:

to go through this gigantic thread...
But has the subject of growing mushrooms been brought up here?
Anyone know how or where to get stuff to do this?

_____

great sources
On April 25th, 2008 Pdubya says:

http://www.mushroompeople...
www.thefarm.org
not sure which clime you are in, but would suggest the dowel method for
shiitake into logs, soaked initially and left outdoors with shade and some
watering.
i'm in florida and can grow a short season of one type of shiitake and a long
season of another strain.
equipment needed
oak logs, 4' x 5"dia
drill with 1/2 to 3/8" bit
a place to "stack" the logs or teepee them
ideally, a soaking vat for icewater and innoculated logs
hammer
dowels innoculated with mycelium
hotplate
cheesewax
pan for wax
paintbrush for hot wax
attention to cleanliness
beer
p.s. good shiitakes go for about $9.00/lb

_____
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hawkiye

Posts : 215
Join date : 2008-05-03
Location : SW Idaho

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:19 am

Here's...
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. the best web link i've ever found on growing mushrooms:
http://www.motherearthnew...
At the end of the article is a list of really good internet resources.
Growing mushrooms is kind of weird and the way you grow each of the various
kinds can be very different. Some of them grow on logs you keep in the shade in
the woods, some you can grow in a box in rice, some you can grow in glass jar,
some you can grow in a plastic container in your frig,etc.
I'm gonna take a stab at shittake and maitake mushrooms. Both of them are
supposed to build and maintain your immune system and both grow on fresh cut
logs in shady woods.
=)

_____

Hey Mart...
On April 25th, 2008 kat says:

Thanks!....I remember seeing a mushroom farm where they were grown in
plastic containers in a garage..looked so easy...I have the worst time with
plants...so I thought I could just concentrate on one or two things rather than
trying to strangle my luck with too much variety.

_____

From what I understand...
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. once you get the mushrooms going on the logs they pretty much take care
of themselves. You just go pick'em now and then and after a couple years start
some new logs.
You drill several holes in a freshly cut log, insert "mothers" in
theholes and then seal off with wax, then stick the log in the shade.
I think a kit with the "mothers" is like $30...
(=

_____

(Scratching my head)
On April 25th, 2008 kat says:

Where do you find the time to learn/know/do all this stuff? Amazing. You're
a walking botanist encyclopedia!

_____

Actually..
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. I'm just handy with google and know very little. Also, I've been talking
to old people I know that are good long-time gardeners/farmers. Bought a few
used books last year on Amazon... Wink

_____

for legal mushrooms,
On April 25th, 2008 e_goldstein says:

you may want to try these guys.
http://www2.mailordercent...

_____

Thank you all my mushroom friends...
On April 27th, 2008 kat says:

For all your mushroom links...This is gonna be fun!

_____

I hate to be a mushroom
On April 25th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

I hate to be a mushroom naysayer, but mushrooms are among the lowest calorie
foods you can grow, and in a famine, I'm not sure you really want to grow diet
food. I'd think high calorie vegetables like potatoes, corn, and sweet potatoes
would be better, along with vitamin-packed produce like tomatoes and yellow
squash.
That's just my opinion, though--I'm sure fresh-picked mushrooms add a lot to
the table, and they do grow in the shade.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Health benefits of two mushrooms...
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

According to Kenneth Jones in Shiitake: The Healing Mushroom , Shiitake
provides noteworthy benefits for ulcers, high or low blood pressure, liver
problems, allergies and autoimmune diseases. A 1980 study found that a virus in
shiitake mushrooms could produce interferon, effective in treating cancer.
Shiitake (Lentinus Edodes) is the second most commonly produced mushroom in the
world because of having both medicinal and food value. It is a flesh, gilled
mushroom that grows on wood. When eaten, it yields 26% protein by dry weight,
carbohydrates, fiber, linoleic acid, vitamins B2, C and D, ergosterol and
possesses abundant quantities of calcium, phosphorus, potassium, iron and all
the essential amino acids needed in our diet. It has been used to treat
nutritional deficiencies and liver ailments.
According to Maitake: King of Mushrooms , by Shari Lieberman, Ph.D. and Ken
Babel, C.N., its polysaccharide compound, beta 1,6 glucan, "is recognized
by researchers as the most effective active agent stimulating cellular immune
responses." Harry Preuss and Sensuke Konno, Ph.D., authors of Maitake
Magic, say that studies show Maitake (Grifola Frondosa) can hamper growth and
spread of cancer cells, protect normal cells from environmental carcinogens,
reduce side effects of and augment chemotherapy, stimulate anti-tumor and
anti-microbial activity, and help to halt HIV proliferation. The National Cancer
Institute declared Maitake more powerful than AZT, with no toxic side effects.
Those with high blood pressure can expect a gradual decrease and Maitake also
reduces blood and liver cholesterol and triglycerides, thus reducing risk of
stroke and heart disease.
http://www.fungusamongus....
(read more about health benefits of other mushrooms there too...)

_____

Great info on Shiitake.
On April 25th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

Great info on Shiitake. I had no idea the protein content was so high.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Back pages of High Times?
On April 24th, 2008 vincebodie says:

=)~
************
I'm surfing on a wave of nostalgia
for an age yet to come
-- Pete Shelley

_____

Okay...well deserved...
On April 24th, 2008 kat says:

I left myself wide open for that....

_____

We got quite a bit of stuff planted the other day
On April 24th, 2008 candance says:

and it rained today so now all we need is some warm weather and things
should start sprouting. Surprised)
I couldn't find organic seed potatoes so I bought several bags at the grocery
store and we planted the eyes.
My question has any ever grown celery..I use to but I can not find any celery
seed anywhere. Anyone have any ideas on where a person might find it ?

_____

Yes, I have grown celery,
On April 24th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

we live in zone 4, and it has to be started in january or february inside,
but if you could find plants at a nursery you could grow it this year. It
requires constant moisture, which here in a drought, is Very difficult.
However, if the flavor of celery is what you want, plant lovage, the herb. It
is a perennial, and one plant would give you enough for a family. The leaves
taste like celery, and you can dry it, and put it in casseroles, soups , tuna,
etc. It is quite good , and known for curing melancholy. Don't know if it
actually does, but it sure tastes good, and comes back every year, free for the
picking.....

_____

Thank you !!
On April 24th, 2008 candance says:

I will look for some Lovage seeds or plants. I wanted to dry the celery for
soups so that would be perfect.

_____

Every place on the internet..
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. is sold out of seed potatoes =|

______________________________________________

>>>>> Daily Paul Page 6 <<<<< Google
Page 5

Page 5, as retrieved on May 6, 2008

______________________________________________

Every place on the internet..
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. is sold out of seed potatoes =|

_____

Hey mart, Check out this
On April 25th, 2008 howard722 says:

Hey mart,
Check out this place:
http://www.seedsavers.org...
They have quite a few varieties in stock.
I got my seed taters from these guys a few weeks ago. They only have a few
varieties in stock:
http://www.highmowingseed...

_____

Cool!
On April 25th, 2008 martfuncher says:

I might plant some taters in one of the new garden plots I tilled today. =)
Thanks!

_____

I guess the organic potatoes from the store will have to do then
On April 24th, 2008 candance says:

.

_____

thanks for this gorgeous, long thread, martfuncher
On April 24th, 2008 photoshopwiz says:
~
thanks for this gorgeous, long thread,
methinks you've set a record for the longest !
and brought a lot of people happiness...
;-)

_____

*blush*
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

yw (=

_____

Yeah yeah yeah!
On April 24th, 2008 Retrocon says:

So yes, I have some transplants ready to go into the SFG raised
beds...instead of 6 inches deep, I went 8 inches deep. Eggplant, cabbages, and
brussels sprouts ready to go in. I messed up the tomatoes, same heirloom type
transplants will be here next week. I transplanted basil, fennel, chamomile,
parsley, and rosemary today...planted chives, cilantro, sage, oregano as well.
I have three different types of mint coming, as well as thyme and something
else I can't remember off the top of my nugget.
Will get marigolds tomorrow....going to seal the darn deck as well. Yippee. So
I will have brussels, brandywine tomatoes, cucumbers, cabbage, red lettuce, slo
bolt lettuce, soybeans, boston favorite beans, radishes, beets, cucumbers, eggplant,
butternut squash, and amish melon. I will also have three cherry grape tomatoes
in pots. For the fall, i will plant spinach and maybe a few other things.
Hehehehe. Very very tired.
Eventually going to get mini dwarfed fruit trees for container growing, but
need to replenish the cash supply first.
I need to figure out my engineering strategy for the rain water barrels....I
want two platforms that can each hold 3 x 55 gallon food grade plastic
drums...that's about 1500 lbs per platform. Not sure which sizes of lumber I
need for the job. Any suggestions?
Hope everyone else is doing well!
The Retrocon
Hope for America, Ron Paul for President in 2008!
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hawkiye

Posts : 215
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Location : SW Idaho

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:24 am

Use pressure treated 4 x 6s,
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

Use pressure treated 4 x 6s, fastened together with 1/2" carriage
bolts.
1/2" carriage bolts can support around 16,000 pounds before failing.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Picked my first lettuce today
On April 24th, 2008 Kay says:

and noticed my potatoes have sprouted. I agree with someone who posted
earlier today - I hope we can keep this going for awhile so we can see how
everyone's gardens do this summer and fall, especially those who are new to
gardening.

_____

Square Foot Gardening
On April 24th, 2008 jon.verret says:

Check out www.squarefootgardening.c...
Great for anyone who doesn't have land. This method is both efficient and
effective. I bought the book and I'm setting up my vegetable garden per the
authors instructions.

_____

Mini-Farm / Gardening Plots in peaceful Costa Rica...
On April 24th, 2008 peaceplace says:

For all of us who wish to live free and grow our own...there are some
dedicated developments (1.25 acre up homesteading plots) in the beautiful
mountainous Central Pacific area of the country. Plot projects located in
distinct micro-climates from 1500ft. to over 4500ft. elevation, for specialized
crops or reforestation. All have access, electric and spring or community
water. All are 100% legal...the title registered in the National Registry &
National Catastro ( plot maps ). All are in desireable and secure areas.
Easy to purchase and economical to own…these garden plots offer folks a TRUE alternative
to living in the mouth of the beast ( which is now closing ) or on the
rollercoaster of manipulated commodities ( like gold & silver ). Build a
house or a simple cabin and BE FREE !!!
For information & assistance with logistics to visit these projects, call
or write.
peaceplace@racsa.co.cr
(506) 2416-8717
Discover Costa Rica..no military...no terrorists...no hype... REALLY !!!

_____

LOL
On April 24th, 2008 Expat but still... says:

I knew that when you insulted my breakdown of the dominican republic that
you were nothing but a LOWLY scoundral salesman.....
I was proven right....
Thanks

_____

It's great that everyone is getting into gardening, but…
On April 24th, 2008 Desert Rat says:

If a food crisis actually happens as so many here predict, all of your
neighbors are going to know who has the food. If your gardens are not looted,
then prepare for an armed home invasion. People could be murdered for a jar of
home canned Lima beans.
It wasn't long ago that Y2K was going to shut down all of commerce when every
computer in the world (except MacIntosh's) would reset from 1999 to 1900
instead of 2000. I uprooted my family from Pasadena, California and moved to
the little crap-hole town of Alpine, Texas to escape what I believed would be
unbelievable chaos in the large cities. I bought over $10,000.00 worth of
survival foods, seeds and supplies of all types. I bought sacks of junk silver
coins for bartering. So, what happened after all of the hype? …Nothing. All of
my survival food has long since spoiled. I tried consuming some of it, but it
tasted bad enough that I knew that I could never stand more that about a week
of such fare.
Bottom line. It never hurts to have a garden. In fact it's a great idea when
times are normal or in places where everyone else is growing one. The things
that I have kept from Y2K is a sizable armory of various semi-automatic weapons
and ammo. If the time ever comes where it becomes becomes a matter life and
death for my family vs. yours… Well, let's just say that I will not whimper off
to die of starvation along with my family. After being denied food by politely
asking someone for it, they had better be prepared to defend their food
hoard/stash to the death, because I will be totally fixated on taking it… And I
will, or I'll die trying.
Sorry. That's just they way things will be if it gets bad enough to drive men
to disparate measures. So include me (and others like me) in your plans for
survival, because the REAL world is a total bitch.
"It does not take a majority to prevail... but rather an irate, tireless
minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men."
Samuel Adams

_____

Plan for various stages of deterioration.
On April 25th, 2008 McClarinJ says:

A debt-free existence in a well-stocked home with garden, alternative power,
and a rainwater catchment system, plus a secure stash of gold and silver, will
get you through hard times up to the point that there are a great many
starving, desperate people coming into your neighborhood.
At that point you need to either be prepared to flee to a survival retreat in a
little-populated area that you've stocked ahead of time, or else have enough
food, guns and ammo that you can field a small army (20 adults or more) to help
you protect your assets.
If roving bands or FEMA stormtroopers threaten your survival retreat, you will
face another fight-or-flight decision. At that point you should be prepared for
an extended all-season wilderness adventure, living on fish, game, wild fruits
and shoots, plus whatever you have had foresight to pack in and bury ahead of
time. Don't plan of setting up house anywhere; you'll have to keep moving.
I've made a good start on handling the first and last phase. I don't have a
remote survival retreat nailed down yet.
I have purchased over two years' supply of grains and beans (about $900 worth)
and have built up a supply of canned and packaged goods in my home. The dry
goods will keep for years as long as they remain dry and bug-free. I have
buried about $12,000 of gold and silver off site and expect to bury more in the
future. I plan a backyard garden and a rainwater catchment system. I have 55
gallons of emergency gasoline, two camp stoves, and a generator for powering
the furnace igniter and blower during heating season. This level of preparation
will make it possible for me to live in relative comfort during a significant
economic downturn but not during near or total societal breakdown.
In the trunk of my car I keep my survival go-bag or "bug out bag,"
actually a large backpack full of survival gear and enough food to get me to
some remote location. Snowshoes are lashed onto the load. Included are fishing
line and lots of hooks, a couple of chipmunk traps (well, rat traps actually)
mess kit, clothes, poncho, and a bulging first aid kit of my own composition.
Of course I would have guns and ammo as well.

_____

I don't know
On April 24th, 2008 Dale in Oklahoma says:

about killing for lima beans, but man some spaghetti-o's might be worth a
fight. :O)

_____

"And I will, or I'll die trying."
On April 24th, 2008 thefreeman says:

RIP...

_____

Oh, I've included 'you' in my plans
On April 24th, 2008 declarationofre... says:

I bought slugs for my 12 gauge...
(actually, I don't even have a shotgun yet..on the to get list though)

_____

You are pathetic
On April 24th, 2008 akak says:

Nice. So you admit you would steal from your neighbors, violating their
rights with not a whiff of regret. So you admit you have the ethics of an
animal and are proud of the fact.
Your post was one of the most disgusting I have ever read here.

_____

That was how I felt...
On April 24th, 2008 kat says:

Thank you for saying it first.

_____

Pathetic?
On April 24th, 2008 Desert Rat says:

Everyone here is living in a dream world to think that their families and
foodstuffs will be safe during a national famine. If the government doesn't
come in and charge you with hoarding, taking your stash, gold and silver and
tossing you the wife and the kiddies into a FEMA camp for experimentation, the
real dregs of society will. This country does not have the good people like
there were during the great depression where folks would just quietly suffer
and die. It will be a Dog eat Dog environment where absolutely nobody will be
safe.
The truth is that YOU are not being honest yourself. When your children cry
during the night because they haven't eaten in four days, and you can smell the
aroma of fresh baked apple pie coming from my house, and I already told you to
"take a hike" because I was not going to feed your tribe + the rest
of the neighborhood.… What ya gunna do, sport? Pout, or come and get my chow by
force if necessary?
You have no idea how desperate the average person will become if the fear
mongering that is loosely tossed about hear actually comes to pass. I consider
myself a really swell guy that wouldn't harm a soul… Under normal conditions,
that is. Then there are those people who are the real animals. They won't just
take a can of beans, like I would and leave you alone. They'll take everything you
have, rape and kill your entire family, kick your dog in the gut for good
measure and then burn your house to the ground.
Talk about being naive. You haven't been disgusted until you witness first hand
the depths and depravity to which a human being will resort when they are
starving to death. Dogs in the back yard and shotguns will not protect you. So,
you ALL better pray that what you are preparing for does not come to pass.

_____

This is an old Walter Mitty
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

This is an old Walter Mitty survivalist fantasy--"Look out, Martha,
here come the starving hordes of armed looters from the city to kill you for
your tomatoes." I haven't figured out why the starving hordes would travel
fifty miles to raid vegetable patches, when looters normally steal and burn and
riot in their own neighborhoods.
What you are doing is justifying your expense of money on semi-automatic
weapons, and your lack of preparedness in other areas. I advise you to
stockpile food and water now while you still can, if you really live in the
desert and really do care about your own family.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Haha..
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. like your misconception and total error with regards to Y2K you are being
a smidgen too apocalyptic. We're talking about when times get hard not a Mad
Max total meltdown and anarchy. Maybe you've watched too many movies.
We're talking about having something to fall back on when others will be totally
dependent on the government. The government won't let people totally starve
because people revolt when they are hungry.
Go ahead an bow down as a slave to the government. We'll be munching on fruit
from fruit trees, from our vines, from our mushrooms growing in the woods.
Go ahead and give up and hold your hand out to the new Uncle Sam. He'll fill
your hands with Monsanto genetically frankenstein food and refined sugar,
refined flour and hydrolyzed oils.
If that's what you want to rely totally on, then fine. We choose
self-reliance...

_____

Martfuncher, that's the
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

Martfuncher, that's the first thing you've said I disagree with...I don't
think the government will feed large numbers of people, at least not until many
have died from starvation and thirst.
Remember's FEMA's performance in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. People
were drowning with no help, while FEMA exacerbated the problems and actually
stopped local volunteers with fishing boats from rescuing the victims.
I'm pretty sure that if a large-scale famine occurs, the government will use
the situation to flex its muscles and enforce martial law, first and foremost,
instead of helping people.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Kevin, you have a point about
On April 24th, 2008 bettymara says:

FEMA making the problem worse and they did not want a lot of them to
survive, it is called poulation control. The food shortages are being created
to create havoc, and those that recieve food from government agencies will be
given GM food that will poison them slowly. The government wants a large-scale
crisis and that is why they have slowly moved us away from understanding our
food supply, and are now creating panic by restricting the food supply. A
garden gets you out of the trap.

_____

when people are starving
On April 24th, 2008 letushope says:

rational thinking is out the window. I too am concerned with the
self-sufficient survival plan. Can you shoot the 17 year old mother at your
gate with a 4 month old child, or the 72 year old widow lady down the road. And
hey if you can (okay) but what happens when there are 200 people climbing your
gate and fence and raiding your garden. I plan to garden, but I don't think it
will carry us all the way through..
If this sounds defeated with a posting name like letushope, trust me I am very
weary! My hope is fading day by day.
I think we need to leave the republican party in a planned approach (same day
kind of thing) and send a message. The republican party has kicked us in the
ass.
It will be years before we can fix it, I have lost so much hope in the America
I thought I knew.

_____

What you are saying..
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

... may be valid for urban and suburban areas. But not so much for clusters
of a few dozen homes in rural areas, which is the type of setting where I live.
We all watch out for each other and I can recognize particular familiar
vehicles by sound without even looking...

_____
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:25 am

For that matter the rural
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

For that matter the rural cops will still be around when the community is
stormed by this supposed gang of 200 garden looters. (All armed to the teeth,
of course--why, didn't you know that all starving looters from the inner city
secretly own $1500 assault rifles?)
Here's the truth.
If times get hard, really hard, starvation hard, unless you have provided food,
land, or water for yourself, you just might perish--because the government,
being immensely uncaring and incompetent, will not feed you, and you won't be
able to feed yourself after the local Wal-Mart is cleaned out. If you don't
perish, you still aren't going to be migrating through the countryside
terrorizing old Aunt Martha in her vegetable garden. You won't get that far,
and in small-town America--unlike New Orleans--the cops are not going to walk
off the job and abandon the town to looters.
But Aunt Martha, with her vegetable patch, her canning, and her chest freezer
will not perish, at least from starvation. And neither will her nearby friends
and relatives.
Now...can we put the Mad Max DVD back in its case and talk about reality here?
Wink
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

well I do live in a rural area
On April 24th, 2008 letushope says:

I am sitting on 13 acres surrounded by lots of atleast 10 acres most
unoccupied. I have the perfect opportunity to garden and live self-sufficient
for some time. BUT when everything runs short they will come hunting for me!

_____

Try to find..
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. city-dwelling Ron Paul supporters who are looking to get out while the
goings good (there are LOTS of them) and offer them cheap plots of land. You
could fit four families on just your 13 acres...

_____

I could not
On April 24th, 2008 letushope says:

my town has a 5 acre minimum on density requirements. At best there is a
family exception that would allow me to let a family member move a
"portable dwelling: (trailor) onto my lot. I could not move 5 families
onto my property.

_____

Wow..
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. 5 acre minimum? In my county there's basically zero restrictions like
that. We have absolutely no building codes either except for codes for service
hookups. They don't allow mobile homes around schools and around some house
clusters, but that's about it.
How far away from a sizeable town or city are you? If gas gets too high people
won't be cruising around in rural areas much. Also, hungry people get
lethargic...

_____

Mart?
On April 24th, 2008 kat says:

What county?...I'm in Hancock..Also, I wonder if the movie 28 Days is based
on the actual time it takes for a person to starve...or just a viral psycho...

_____

=)
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

The Free State of Jones (county) 10% for Dr. Paul.
Some people can live for months without food

_____

you'll be surprised
On April 24th, 2008 letushope says:

I live less than 50 miles to the University of Florida (Gainesville,
Florida)

_____

Would you come to my house
On April 24th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

when my teenagers are having a stingy, bratty attitude?

_____

like...
On April 24th, 2008 kat says:

when my seventeen year old is on her period...

_____

Hehe...
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. the Wrath of Akak >Wink
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Well, Martfuncher, I was
On April 24th, 2008 akak says:

Well, Martfuncher, I was handing out lollipops and ass-whoopin's today, and
I'm all out of lollipops!

_____

I live..
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. in the country surrounded by houses that have more guns than people,
several rottweiller class canines, 4-wheelers, etc..
Come mess with us. I dare ya! >Wink

_____

If he lives in the
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

If he lives in the Trans-Pecos, and his stock of water and fuel is
comparable to his food preparations, I don't think you have anything to worry
about. He'd never get closer to civilization than Van Horn. Wink
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Haha..
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. true. =P

_____

Yeah, I was one of those who saved
On April 24th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

food for Y2k, but we were poorer than you, obviously, and only saved food
that we normally eat, which is food in bulk, having a large family, and canning
and drying our garden food. Y2k didn't happen, but my husband didn't have much
work for most of a year. So, because we saved all that food, etc, we didn't go
bankrupt, being able to eat well, and put all our money towards our bills. And
we too, will be able to protect our supply.

_____

Then in that case, you'd
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

Then in that case, you'd unfortunately risk your own life. I'm not even
offended, because this is so silly.
If you think rural people are going to be little 80-year-old grannies who won't
have anything to defend themselves but a walking cane, you don't know much
about rural people. And I'm talking about ordinary folks, not people on the
right-wing/libertarian fringes.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Fruit trees.
On April 24th, 2008 iehuvihs says:

Plant perenials and fruit trees as well. Don't depend on the market, product
your own food if you can.

_____

Fruit trees and nuts are a
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

Fruit trees and nuts are a great idea.
Peach trees, turkey figs, and pecans will thrive in most soils in the Sun Belt,
for example.
Red, sandy soils are ideal for most fruits, while black clay is ideal for
growing large pecan trees.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Can someone define re: seeds
On April 24th, 2008 Susan says:

Heirloom
Organic
Untreated
I am understanding that Heirloom Seeds are 'open pollinators', you can save seed
and replicate the plant the next year.
Organic, as far as I can tell anyway, may be heirloom or not, but have been
organically grown/collected and are generally untreated by irradiation.
Untreated I take it means they have not been irradiated (which makes it so
collected seeds won't produce)
Can anyone verify that I have managed to get this correct or add to my
understanding of what seed to aquire?

_____

Here is...
On April 24th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. some definitions. Pretty close to what you stated already:
http://www.nbnwdesign.com...

_____

A lot of people talk about
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

A lot of people talk about non-hybrid seeds, and I think buying them is a great
idea, but you can also achieve a permanent garden without them by planting
perennials and root vegetables.
For example, with asparagus, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and some varieties of
pumpkins, you don't need to buy any special seeds.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

We're growing
On April 24th, 2008 jshowell says:

A DELEGATE REVOLUTION!

_____

Remind me to go to one of
On April 24th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

Remind me to go to one of the convention delegate posts and mention planting
squash, cucumbers, watermelons, and beans.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

______________________________________________

>>>>> Daily Paul Page 9 <<<<< Google
Page 8

Page 8, as retrieved on April 21, 2008
_________________________________________

I bought the solar generator
On March 28th, 2008 libertylover4 says:

I bought the solar generator here. Everything is included. He had a special
for $995.00 It cost $1,299.00 now. He's a Ron Paulite.
Contact Ken, he might have a special coming.
http://kensolar.com/tek9....
When I bought additional batteries, I went here. Sun Extender is the brand
name. Cost about $180
http://www.midamericasola...
Make sure they are solar batteries. Yes, rv and marine batteries are o.k. but
solar batteries are designed for solar applications.
Solar panels sell for approx. $5.50 a watt.

_____

Life In THe Country
On March 27th, 2008 libertylover4 says:

Red potatoes, sweet potatoes, and onions in the ground for a couple of weeks
now.
Greenhouse look'in nice with all kind of seedlings up and growing
lovely. Bless you God.
Garden tilled and ready. Chickens free ranging, loving the worms and
bugs. Between the bugs and sprouts, the eggs will taste fantastic.
Grow various sprouts indoors in the dark to feed the rabbits and
chickens. My water well has the best tasting spring water.
Killed and skinned 25 each cornish hens/rabbits and canning the meat
tomorrow morning. Nothing will go to waste. Make my own bloodmeal
and catfish bait. Neighbor gets the chicken/rabbit skins for feather pillows
and rabbit pelts
Share a Jersey milk cow (Selma) with two neighbors. We rotate days so each only
has to milk every third day. We have enough for each to have
butter, milk, canned milk, and cheese and enough extra to sell. One of the
neighbors is retired so she makes me sour cream and cream cheese and I barter
her eggs and whole chickens.
We have the folks around our area who all get together, the men mill the wheat
(we go down to the feed store and get food grade wheat) and the women make
bread once a week. Since farmers always listen to the reports on commodities,
we have a two year supply of commodities on hand. Our next supply will double
the cost.
One neighbor grows herbs and mushrooms. Another neighbor growns watermelons,
cantalopes, strawberries, blackberries, blue berries, pumpkins, and muscadine
grapes. We all barter one thing or another.
I'm so blessed to have no debt. I pray the gold and silver I do have will
pay the $40 year taxes on the property for years..
I bought an old 36' RV which had solar panels on top. I've bought and added 6
solar panels standing freely and batteries in cases for 4 solar generators on
dollies so I can roll them to the solar panels to charge and then roll them
around to run various stuff.
I drive a 150cc motor scooter to work 4 miles from home. 85 mpgallon
sure helps. I own a Workman (made in the U.S.A.) 3 wheel pedal truck I bought
at auction. On those days it rains, I pedal the covered tricycle truck to work.
I stay over in the service road so I won't bother anyone and so many toot their
horns knowing who I am.
I set a goal 5 years ago. Get out of the large city and move to the country.
My last goal is to design a solar motor scooter. I have the blueprints and
have saved half of the money for the scooter. See how the solar scooter will
look. When driving , the solar panels fold up. When scooter is sitting, the
solar panels fold out to soak up the sun's energy.
http://www.builditsolar.c...
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:29 am

Curious as to what part of the country
On March 28th, 2008 Sonny says:

that you have you oasis? - must be southern?

_____

Don
On March 28th, 2008 DaddyWarBucks says:

What do you think about mass producing the solar scooters?
Interested?
"PunJab! Bring me my checkbook!"

_____

Sounds fun!
On March 28th, 2008 CarrotTop says:

Bless you God for the snow that's falling on us today. We have to be real
patient for spring around here. It's extra hard when I read things like this.

_____

Niiiiiice!
On March 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:
(=

_____

Hey!! Nice scooter!! So how
On March 28th, 2008 voterp says:

Hey!! Nice scooter!! So how hard would it be to build a pretty good sized
solar powered generator?
Do you know?
Thanks for all the info.

_____

Square Foot Gardening
On March 27th, 2008 meghandan1 says:

Hi,
Glad so many others are getting ready to do something down to earth too. My
husband and I are starting a Square foot Garden right now. The cost for us has
been in peat moss and vermiculite. We found a construction site that was
tossing 2x6s and lathe and we got enough for about 30 boxes. We put an ad for
ourselves on craigslist to "farm" on someone else's land and found
just what we wanted. By the way, even boefore learning this method, I have been
"training" my tomatoes in much the same way for years. Evne saw a
website for a fellow who grows 800 tomato plants a year and he pulls all the
leaves off until they get to about 6 feet and he still has sufficient yield to
have a business. The advantages are many in this method, grow the equivalent of
a 20 x 40 garden in only 160 square feet and you can eat for half the year.
Plus the compact size means you can build lids of clear plastic and grow many
veggies into the dead of winter. Good luck everyone.

_____

Better make sure..
On March 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. the lumber is not treated. Can make you and the plants sick...
=|

_____

Lumber? Use the recycled plastic 2x6s
On March 28th, 2008 Tannim says:

Termite-proof, fade-proof, crack-proof, and look a lot better, no warping
either.

_____

Those are..
On March 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. expensive aren't they?

_____

Where can
On March 28th, 2008 jenmckin says:

you find these? I'm new to gardening this year.

_____

You can get them
On March 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. at Home Depot/Lowes, etc.
Here is one of the plastic timbers 5.5 ft long 5.5 inches wide for $12.
http://www.homedepot.com/...
Instead of nailing them together you have to get the special connectors made
for it.
Just the plastic "wood" for a 5'x5' frame (without connectors) is
going to be $50. Cheaper than most pre-made ones I've seen around. But still
not as cheap tilling up some dirt if you have good dirt.
If you have poor dirt you could spend the $50 on soil components and make a much
bigger than 5x5 patch of poor soil better.
Raised beds ARE better for colder climates because the soil gets warmer quicker
and stays warmer longer... but you have to water more often.

_____

Nah, don't need the connectors. Never use nails.
On March 29th, 2008 Tannim says:

Just use Loctite Power Grab Adhesive (works in a caulking gun) and wood
screws or nuts and carriage bolts and you'll be fine.

_____

For connecting....
On March 30th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. plastic lumber comprised of two hollow rectangular tubes stacked on top
of each other?
How do you connect them with wood screws?
Take a look at this pic...
http://www.homedepot.com/...

_____

So...Clay alkaline soil in
On March 27th, 2008 voterp says:

So...Clay alkaline soil in the high desert.
Will this work in the Lasagne Method?
Will the grass and newspaper decompose fast enough? Do I need to put something
on the grass first?
Also can you plant food in pots?

_____

I do lasagna gardening in alkaline
On March 28th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

high desert soil. As long as it is kept moist, it will decompose fast
enough, and you will get earthworms, too. It is the only easy way to garden
here, as if you don't, you will be watering constantly, at least where we are,
in a drought. No, you don't need to put anything on the grass, just wet it very
well, and begin with your wet newspapers and layers of mulch. Your clay soil
will eventually turn into nice loam.

_____

Voterp
On March 27th, 2008 cyndezu says:

I would defiantly try trench method mentioned in an earlier post.
Because of its density Clay soil needs a lot of organic matter for roots to
grow. Clay is not bad, nutrient wise, in fact very good and holds moisture,
just dense.
Adding good,rich soil and organic matter would allow you to plant after your
freeze date depending on your zone and 'soften your soil gradually.

_____

Dig a "V" trench in your
On March 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

Dig a "V" trench in your poor soil and fill it would good stuff.
You need something that promotes drainage like vermiculate then a good soil
with compost..
It's called "trench" gardening....

_____

ha ha
On March 27th, 2008 cyndezu says:

double post. I was talking about your post earlier Martfuncher

_____

I will try to find the
On March 28th, 2008 voterp says:

I will try to find the trench post...Do I need a good tool for that? I am
not overly strong..

_____

We must be..
On March 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. on the same wavelength.
I don't have anything against the other methods being mentioned just that the
materials for them can be expensive and there are other drawbacks like limited
depth and the need for extra watering...
(=

_____

Why bother with a garden?
On March 27th, 2008 jzneff says:

If you're planting a garden, you'd better be ready to defend it 24/7,
because starving people will be desperate to steal, and starving armed people
will think nothing of burying you in your garden.
Rather than (or including) that, maybe you should just stock 3-4 years worth of
ramen noodles...wait until a sale of 10 or 12 for 1$, and enough propane to
cook them and heat your home. Now you only have to defend your house, which is
much easier than a garden.
You can spend the extra time the others are wasting on getting food and you can
figure out how to get your family out of this mess to a better place. I guess
it also should go without saying that you should be decently armed by this
point.

_____

HAHAHA!
On March 28th, 2008 Tannim says:

They'll be starving after your GMO crops failed from superbugs!
3-4 years of MSG Ramen noodles? That's just silly! Besides, it's been known for
almost 40 years that MSG is a leading contributor to food addiction and
obesity. Don't touch that excitotoxin with a 10-foot pole!
Besides, if you do it right, you barter labor for food, and everyone wins.

_____

You're afraid of MSG?
On March 28th, 2008 jzneff says:

My definition of excitotoxin...something which causes harm when it's
introduced to lab rats at quantities that are wholly unrealistic for a natural
amount of human consumption. Check the studies, you're talking about 4g/kg
consumption every day for weeks to get the problematic effects.
That's equivilent to an average person consuming almost a pound of pure MSG
every day. Consuming a pound of almost anything will give you some bad effects.
MSG...it's sodium and glutamate.
Sure, sodium in excess probably isn't real good for you, but sodium is
something your body absolutely needs.
Glutamate is a naturally occuring amino acid. It's in most things you eat.
There is 8 times as much glutamate in an 8oz glass of grape juice compared to 1
tablespoon of soy sauce.
MSG, GMO, are these really the things we need to be concerned about? Or should
we call them distractions meant to make freedom loving people seem like
conspiracy theorists and thus marginalizes us in the eyes of the general public
Some other things that are "excitotoxins"

_____

I'm allergic to it, you dumbass!
On March 29th, 2008 Tannim says:

And you are obivously nothing more than an ignorant moron. There is a far
cry from the glutamate that occurs in the body naturally and the artificial
stuff that is laced into foods unnecessarily. If you actually knew anything
about the food industry you would know that.
You probably have no idea what names MSG hides under in ingredient lists,
either...or how it screws with neural transmitters.

_____

Breathe in slow and deep...
On March 31st, 2008 martfuncher says:

... then exhale slowly...using your diaphragm
*repeat as necessary*
=P

_____

Apparently
On March 31st, 2008 jzneff says:

You don't know how even your body works, let alone
this broad knowledge you're claiming about the food industry.
First of all, no, the MSG that is "laced" into food is chemically
identical to many forms of MSG found in nature, and once consumed, it forms
glutamic acid which is present in large quantities in every cell in your body.
Yes, much of the glutamate found in nature is tied up in a protein chain, but
the kind found in grape juice is ionically bonded free glutamate and thus is
the exact same thing as MSG.
Second of all...you are not allergic to MSG. It is not possible in any way
shape or form. It will, however, allow an increased histamine response to an
already occuring allergic reaction. It "screws with"
neurotransmitters? That's a blanket statement that shows you have no idea what
effect it has on your body. It stimulates your neurotransmitters, which is why
it has such a profound effect on taste. I know you want to demonize the food
industry (probably along with every industry) for adding a naturally occuring
compound to food to make it taste better, but I appreciate all of the work
they've done finding such an additive.
Lastly, don't blame MSG for weight gain and obesity. The Japanese are very
large consumers of MSG and have very little problem with obesity. The cause of
the massive amount of obesity in this country is a culture obesessed with
overconsumption and a very seditary lifestyle.
You are the worst kind of uneducated person. You think you're educated because
you've read books that try to prove a linkage between the evil corporations and
every problem that we face. You're part of the blame culture and are clouding
our movement to suit your own crusades. Have you ever read a book or article
critical of the movements you champion? Have you taken the time to critically
study the science behind what you're talking about? Or have you simply taken
all of your views from a narrow line of books that point the finger of blame
away from the true source and to one that's easier to demonize.
And yes, I know quite well what names MSG "hides" in ingredient
lists. It is not the result normally of trying to "hide" the
addition, rather, it's because it was added by a third party as a spice blend.
It is absolutely federal law to list monosodium glutamate as an additive, so
what more do you want Uncle Sam to protect you from? I'm sure you're
envisioning an army of MSG police that patrol every food packaging plant,
testing samples and measuring the amount added to ensure full compliance. What
you don't consider is the extra cost of regulation of this magnitude and the
fact that the market doesn't desire it.
There's only a small packet of people like you in this country, who think it's
government's job to police the food. We should all give up our money in pity of
people like you who are allergic to everything. Most people just use common
sense, and realize that buying a bag of potato chips or a Twinkie is just not a
very healty thing to do, and try to limit how much we do it.
Isn't it funny that when you donate a bunch of grains to starving people in the
third world...they never ask for a gluten free version or about the
preservatives used in the food? The reason is that people in this country have
too much time and energy on their hands.
Tannim...worry about your own health and well-being and don't waste the time of
people who are trying to get meaningful change accomplished just so you can
feed your own psychosis.



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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:31 am

How about...
On March 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. a garden PLUS a huge stash of ramen? Ramen tastes WAY better with fresh
garden veggies in it.
(=

_____

No offense, but that's a
On March 28th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

No offense, but that's a ludicrous survivalist fantasy, mostly inspired by
Walter Mittys who want an excuse to spend $1500 on a Big Black Semi-Automatic
rifle instead of a six month supply of food.
Hungry people do not form looting mobs and kill other people who harbor food.
Hungry people are typically lethargic and stay in one spot waiting for
handouts. In the aftermath of Katrina, there were no roaming violent mobs of
distressed people who pillaged the countryside of Baton Rouge.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

None taken...but
On March 31st, 2008 jzneff says:

I'm never a proponent of spending that kind of money on firearms. I'm all
about quantity over quality. Buy them used, and buy lots of them.
Hungry people do not form looting mobs...or at least have rarely done so in the
history of this country. They'll stay lethargic and hungry until they realize
that it isn't working. In the aftermath of Katrina, yes, it took forever for a
federal response...but it came. If we had been talking about a few weeks, how
many of the people would have starved to death in the Superdome? Probably very
few, because they would have gotten desperate and went looking for food.
If we had some type of cataclismic collapse of society (which probably won't
happen in my lifetime, despite what many think) people would know that no
handout is coming, and WILL get desperate. Don't think people will remain in
the inner city once the place is looted beyond recognition. They will invade
the suburbs, and then the rural areas.
All i'm saying is if the stuff really hits the fan, be ready to be self reliant
for a few years. Ramen noodles is what I suggested for sake of brevity because
they have a long shelf life and are very cheap. It goes without saying that you
should also have some vitamins, some Ensure, some gatorade, canned food, etc.
I would estimate that out of 300 million Americans...maybe 1% of them can be
self reliant. That leaves approximately 297,000,000 hungry mouths for someone
to feed. I'm prepared to feed 3 people for 2 years, and the rest should be
ready to dodge some .206 slugs if they want my Twinkies.

_____

After Katrina I remember
On March 29th, 2008 john2k says:

After Katrina I remember reading about and seeing pictures of the looting,
but it was people looting stores rather than stealing from other people
(afaik). I saw photos of food stores that were broken into with people taking
what food and water they could get their hands on. Even police officers were
looting the food stores in some instances. But the worst is when I saw photos
of the people who were looting out of greed instead of need. One pic showed a
guy with a cart full of Nike sneakers... I recall him having a pretty big
smile.

_____

I agree with you...
On March 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. 99%.
Where I'm at after Katrina we had hungry people looting in town and the
national guard was called in (with manned 50mm turrets on the vehicles!).
Nothing out in the country where I'm at though. Moral here is to get out of the
city in my opinion...
Wink

_____

Right. You'll have looting
On March 30th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

Right. You'll have looting with distressed people in the city, but it'll
probably be within 5 miles of where they are distressed. If you're far from the
city, people aren't going to come attack you in order to steal your tomatoes
and ears of corn. In the country, on farmland, growing as much as you can, is
the safest place you can be.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

I live...
On March 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. in a rural community and in my "neighborhood" each house has
anywhere from 3 to 10 acres. I know most of them and because of the firearm
population being greater than the number of people I don't think anybody will
be messing with our gardens!
I'm up for some target practice. Oh, and several people around here have
rottweillers...
>Wink

_____

In rural communities most
On March 28th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

In rural communities most residents are well-armed, including the elderly.
The octagenarian gentleman who lives across the road from me in Hill County has
a fully-stocked gun safe in his garage, and he and his wife go elk hunting
every year.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Haha..
On March 28th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. yeah. I know old people that NOBODY better get near their property. I
can't tell you how many times around here eldery ladies who live alone have
pulled shotguns on people.
"Who the hell are you and why are you on my property?!"
>Wink

_____

Canning, among other things...
On March 27th, 2008 Devon_Saunders says:

plus plenty of fresh goodies if done right. It's more about getting off the
grid for me and mine... we spent a little over a grand last year for groceries.
We didn't really have to.
Anyone trying to loot our garden has to get to it first... past the guard dogs,
the geese, then two irate adults with a lot of fire-power. Not to mention that
if they are driving up we can see them from a mile and a half away...lol.

_____

A little historical fact for
On March 27th, 2008 Expat but still... says:

A little historical fact for all you doomsday gardeners preparing for the
worst....
During the Soviet Unions genocide of 25 million citizens, 10-12 million of
which were Ukrainians. The Soviets succeeding this buy preventing food to the
markets and any one who was Caught GROWING THEIR OWN food was confiscated, If
solitary women, RAPED, and on occasion KILLED. Can you Imagine a town of 5
thousand fighting each other for an illegal potatoe...
The worst part, Ukraine is considered the Breadbasket of europe.
That was back then when people barely relied on Public transportaion of foods
to each village. They were truly self sustaining communities.......

_____

...Soviet and Ukrainian
On March 28th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

...Soviet and Ukrainian citizens did not possess firearms.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

It's not all "farming". You
On March 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

It's not all "farming". You can have muscadine grapes growing,
blueberry bushes, fig trees, assorted vines in the woods or on the edge of the
wood, other fruit trees, etc..
Besides, there were rural areas that the Stalin goons didn't mess with. The
Stalinists focused on a few geographic areas for their experiments in starvation...

_____

While this is true maybe in
On March 27th, 2008 voterp says:

While this is true maybe in that time..the benefit of being Americans ...is
our right to bear arms.
Women can defend themselves with a gun...this helps for a politer society even
in bad times..

_____

As bad as the Neocons and
On March 27th, 2008 akak says:

As bad as the Neocons are and their power-lust is, I'm not sure they are
ready to go THAT far anytime soon. But enforced poverty and FEMA camps and
martial law? Easily.

_____

Gardens For RON Paul!
On March 27th, 2008 mysticgeek says:

This should be a summer theme! Gardens for Ron Paul and Freedom! Post your
signs and freedom flags all over!
Computer Tutorials For All At:
http://blogs.howtogeek.co...

_____

Whats a muscadine?
On March 27th, 2008 jwilli17 says:

Whats a muscadine?

_____

I was wondering about that
On March 27th, 2008 akak says:

I was wondering about that myself. Maybe some new genetically-created organism,
like the glow-in-the-dark jellyfish potato under discussion in another thread?

_____

Muscadines..
On March 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. are a large grape native to the South (also called scuppernongs). They
are about 3 times the size of a grape, have a more earthy flavor and about 40
times more reservatol (the stuff in red wine that protects your heart) than red
grapes.
Easy to grow too if you are in the South. Just two posts and 20 feet of wire...
http://en.wikipedia.org/w...

_____

Not to mention
On March 27th, 2008 jenmckin says:

that they are also now considered a super food by many natural/holistic
doctors.
Recent studies have shown that they may actually have more antioxidants than
blueberries. Now THAT is saying something!
They make wine with it on Clinch Valley Mountain in TN. But I was born in
Batesville and my mother grew up eating them. Smile

_____

And to boot..
On March 27th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. in the South they grow with very little care. They are somewhat drought
resistant and can grow in poorer soils. Where I'm at you can find them growing
out in the woods sometimes.
And they make excellent jelly...
=)

_____

What grape thrives in black
On March 28th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

What grape thrives in black clay? Do you know?
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

______________________________________________

>>>>> Daily Paul Page 21 <<<<< Google
Page 4

Page 4, as retrieved on May 4, 2008

_______________________________________________

Started germinating
On March 26th, 2008 i4freedom says:

seeds a few weeks ago. They look great. All organic seeds. My yard is very
small but I will manage with pots or an elevated garden. I hope to can some hot
sauce, tomatoe sauce, and jelly!
Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

_____
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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:33 am

here in south east texas, got it going a few weeks ago.
On March 26th, 2008 honeybee says:

am so excited. i have had a garden most of my 33 yrs. of marriage. revived
it after a 2 year hiatus. ordered seeds from heirloom seeds.
All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is
violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
Arthur Schopenhauer

_____

Same here
On March 26th, 2008 sistagirl86 says:

in my part of south east TX. Got the tomatoes, peppers, cukes, strawberries,
squash, cilantro, basil all in and coming along nicely. Fruit trees all look to
be healthy. Have wild grapes that grow here but also adding a few Concords (just
to see if they'll grow/produce). Loads of dewberries that grow along the fences
in the spring; all of the blooms make me think this will be a good year
berries.
Just broke ground on a second, much larger area for feed corn (for the
chickens), sweet corn (for us), beans, purple hulls and maybe some new
potatoes.
Will wait a little longer to put in the okra since that's one of the few things
that seems to thrive in the hottest part of the summer.
The post about the watermelons makes me realize I'm gonna have to do a little
more tilling 'cause now I just gotta plant some of those.
Here's hoping we don't get hit with a heatwave this summer!

_____

Have to wait until at least May here in Michigan.
On March 26th, 2008 iehuvihs says:

Gardening is great, what you may want to try is to get a group of people
together and each one specialize in a few vegetables. Instead of trying to
plant all of them yourself you can exchange. I have my Ron Paul Victory Garden
all planned. Even plan to plant a Liberty tree in the middle of my front lawn
for discussing politics with neighbors.

_____

The snow just came here in
On March 26th, 2008 m72mc says:

The snow just came here in Sweden. Though soon it´s spring, but I have no
garden. I have promised my mother to come help her with her garden late in
April.

_____

Heja Sverige! Snon kom har i
On March 26th, 2008 FreedomRules says:

Heja Sverige!
Snon kom har i USA idag ocksa (Montana). Ha det sa bra och sprid budskapet :-).
Friheten styr!

_____

I wish!
On March 26th, 2008 randyjones says:

There is still a little clump of snow in my yard, though most has melted by
now. I was hoping to start some small plants inside this year so they would
have a head start while things are warming up outside. Haven't made any
progress, though.
I'm at 5,500 feet in the "hills" between Lake Tahoe and Reno, NV.
Best wishes to all on a bountiful garden this year!

_____

I'm starting two victory
On March 26th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

I'm starting two victory gardens next month as well. Anyone with ANY amount
of land (even a suburban backyard) should be doing this.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Sabbath Year
On April 1st, 2008 dCarr says:

According to the Bible, you are supposed to only grow food 6 years out of seven.
This year is the seventh (from everything I can tell), so expect a bunch of
crop failures.

_____

My victory garden is started...
On March 26th, 2008 pegarizona says:

Herbs... basil, parsley, oregano,cilantro and garlic chives and in the big
garden I am planting tomatoes, squash, eggplant, yellow cucumbers,ocra, bell
peppers,green beans,radishes and carrots. I wanted to grow potatoes and corn
out here but no such luck. I am from North West PA Amish country and it was
easier to grow back there not to mention all the wild berries we had for
canning.

_____

Oh man, homegrown
On March 26th, 2008 akak says:

Oh man, homegrown watermelon! I would almost fly to Mississippi just to
taste that! Needless to say, here in Alaska, any watermelons we do get (from
Mexico?) pale in comparison.
Cabbages and the other cole vegetables all do well here, and lettuce, and
carrots and beets (I don't touch those, though). I like root parsley also, a
traditional Polish vegetable. Tomatoes and beans are almost a lost cause here
unless you have ideal location and ideal weather.
No tree fruits here except crabapples, but I do grow a lot of gooseberries,
which make fantastic jam (well, I think so, but not everyone agrees).

_____

I'm planting...
On March 26th, 2008 martfuncher says:

... yellow-meated watermelons this year. Same as red/pink ones basically
with a hint of savory (think cantaloupe).

_____

Hey, I know those! Oh man,
On March 26th, 2008 akak says:

Hey, I know those! Oh man, that's no fair --- now I have a hankering for
that!
My great-grandparents in Alabama (Citronelle) had a large farm and grew those
yellow watermelons too --- wow, were they ever good! I would eat it until I was
sick!
But I haven't seen or tasted one in thirty years.

_____

I'd send ya one...
On March 26th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. but shipping would probably be $50.
=P

LOL! Or more! But I would
On March 26th, 2008 akak says:

LOL! Or more! But I would almost pay it, just to have one again.
You are lucky to be able to grow those there.
Our saving grace is wild berries, which Alaska is blessed with, both in variety
and abundance. I go out and pick hundreds of pounds of them every year (hence
the time spent in the wild), but it is my business. I also buy more than that
from others, to make wild berry jams and jellies.

_____

ssb2
On April 15th, 2008 martfuncher says:
O_o

_____

ssb
On March 29th, 2008 martfuncher says:
o_O

______________________________________________

>>>>> Daily Paul Page 22 <<<<< Google
Page 21

Page 21, as retrieved on May 6, 2008

______________________________________________

Companion Planting
On March 26th, 2008 Liberty_ Belle says:

"Carrots love tomatoes" book!
http://www.amazon.com/Car...

_____

Layout and seeds
On March 26th, 2008 bettymara says:

I'm working with a gardener right now and the only suggestion I received was
radishes with the potatoes. Also marigolds help as well with bugs. As far as
seeds the place I recommend and use is http://www.jlhudsonseeds.... I like their
business approach. The webpage can be a little overwhelming when looking for
seeds, but the catalog they send out is better. They have a lot of good
information on the webpage. Let me know if you have any other questions

_____

I'll add one to that as well
On March 26th, 2008 Tannim says:

Beneficial insects are always a good addition, such as ladybugs and preying
mantises. So is adding earthworms to the soil.
And Alyssum planted around brocoli and other brassicas ward off aphids.
Shop around on seeds, too. Some places have better deals than others, but you
need to watch your hot and cold days levels and the mositure requirements as
well.

_____

I raised potatoes one year
On March 26th, 2008 E. Oregon 4 Ron says:

by laying the cut potatoes on tilled soil, then covering them with a foot of
clean straw. When the potatoes were ready, you could lift the straw and pick
potatoes without disturbing the plant. The new potatoes were on top of the ground
under the straw. Has anyone else tried this?
It worked great for me one year, then the next year it didn't work. I think the
kids/dogs rearranged the straw too much, and that portion of the garden had
different soil.
I am going to try that again this year as you can raise a big crop in a small
space, plant them earlier, and not have to till and pull weeds.

_____

Potatoes
On March 26th, 2008 bettymara says:

I was told to cut the potatoe into pieces with 2 to 3 eyes on each piece ( i
basically quartered mine and had enough), then to let it dry out completely.
Then bury it about an inch under the top with at least 8 inches for growth
underneath. Also plant the pieces at least 6 inches apart so they don't get
tangled. Just a little tip from me, make sure you don't let the pieces dry
where the birds can get them.

_____

When you plant potatoes that way
On March 26th, 2008 E. Oregon 4 Ron says:

You mound dirt around the plant as it grows, which causes more runners off
the plant and makes a bigger crop. Trying to remember----but I'm guessing the
mounds should end up being 10 to 12 inches high around the plant. Mounding also
helps keep the potatoes close to the surface from being sunburned--the green
color---which is actually toxic and is bitter to the taste.

_____

A big greenhouse lamp
On March 26th, 2008 CarrotTop says:

suspended from the ceiling in a spare bedroom gets us started indoors every
spring, since March temps are still in the 30's. And, yes, we've started.
Yesterday I added 60 Wave Petunia seeds for our annual rip-snorting,
jaw-dropping, hanging basket dramatics.

_____

Time is my issue
On March 26th, 2008 jkeehn1 says:

Got lots of plans though. Looking for Citrus, Tangerine, Orange, Kumquat,
Rudy Red Grapefruit. Got seeds for Beans, Peas, Tomatoes, Cantaloupe,
Watermelon, Beets, and Carrots plus Garlic and Rosemary for a border.
May be a little too late down in central Fla, but I'm going to give it a shot
anyway.

_____

Some ideas...
On March 26th, 2008 hopefulfilled says:

I live in the north, and although I have started plants for the garden in my
sunroom, still too early to plant anything. BUT, I am picking parsnips from
last year (sweet as honey, being sweetened by the frost all winter ), and green
onions, (perennial, egyptian onions, never buy seeds again), and dandelions are
coming up. (the only weed that is safe from being torn up in my garden). I have
red orach, which i let go to seed every year, so I don't have to plant it,
coming up now. Yumm, fresh greens. I also let my lettuce go to seed in the
garden, so it pops up everywhere, and don't have to plant much of that. I do
the lazy way. permanent beds of lots of mulched beds. No tilliing,
(eventually). Also, cilantro and dill and chamomile self seeds every year, so I
don't have to plant those either. I live in dry west, drought here, so it is
the only way to grow, with lots of mulch. Remember to plant as much perennials
as you can, easier, and you get to spend more time with annuals. Parsnips can
stay in the ground all winter, giving you your first fresh vegs in the spring.

_____

I have some of my seeds started
On March 26th, 2008 candance says:

in my greenhouse and waiting for it to warm up enough to plant them
outside.
I don't know if everyone is aware of this but there are Yahoo freecycle
groups all across the country. It is a great place to find canning jars and
lids for free.

_____
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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:34 am

Just got ours
On March 26th, 2008 imunplugged says:

started over the weekend. All heirloom seeds. Purple, black and pick
tomatoes. Every color of pepper you can think of. Our only problem is we need a
bigger yard. We have grapes, blueberries, golden raspberries. I can't wait.
We'll even be trying some potatoes this year, sweet potatoes too!! We use a
product called Sonigrow. Its an organic fertilizer that you spray on and then
you play music to your garden, I know sounds crazy, but it works!! It not only
produces bigger fruits and veggies, it produces more, and faster!!! Check it
out. Just google it, you can buy it from several different distributers.

_____

Yes, the spray and chirping music works!
On March 26th, 2008 CarrotTop says:

For years we have used Sonic Bloom and the little chirping machine (sounds
like birds) and it works. We get Jack in the Beanstalk tomato plants that give
450 pounds of tomatoes in a small area (the 450 lbs are for the area, not each
plant) . We chirp the plants until they are huge and covered with blossoms, and
then covered some more, and then stop the chirping to let the plant quit making
blossoms, and let the fruit grow.
For those who have never heard of this, the chirping sound gadget plays at the
exact note that opens up the pores under the leaves to absorb the sprayed on
organic fertilizer, Sonic Bloom.

_____

Haha..
On May 2nd, 2008 martfuncher says:
.. weird Wink
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Amazing how God designed birds to help the plants grow! Wow.
On March 26th, 2008 missdavenport says:

*** God bless Ron Paul ***
* Ron Paul For President *

_____

If a garden is not possible for you...
On March 26th, 2008 airborne373 says:

contact a small local farmer. They will sometimes sell you a fractional
share of their harvest. For example a local Amish farmer I know will sell a
fractional share for around $500.00 in the beginning of the season. They you
receive up to 62 different fruits and vegetables once a week for 25 weeks. Each
share is enough for four. There are no chemicals the ground is alive, (ask a
farmer what that means.) and there is never any SATANIC GMO. This is a real
win/win.

_____

One thought on this
On March 26th, 2008 bettymara says:

I'm not nay saying this at all, but I did have any experience with this. My
mom and bought a couple of shares from a local farm and we ran into the problem
of not being able to eat part of it because we weren't used to the vegetables
we got. I've never had turnips, and had no idea about how to plan a meal with
them. My mom couldn't stand mustard greens, and after a couple fo meals from
it, I was having difficulty with eating them. So it made it difficult for us.
We decided that it would be better to do our own gardens with vegetables that
we know and like, and in smaller quantities. My advice is to check with the
local farm and see what vegetables they do plant and offer in a share, to see
if it is something you can work with. See if they will offer half shares. There
are also ways to have gardens indoors as well with planters. Do some research
to find what best works for you.
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Mmmmm
On March 26th, 2008 sistagirl86 says:

turnips, turnip greens, mustard greens.....
All truly classic southern foods. Just remember, all should be prepared with
LOTS of bacon grease and served with a side of cornbread.
Might have to do a little more tilling and add some of that stuff.

_____

Some CSAs also run farmstands
On March 26th, 2008 Tannim says:

I know the one we had in Pueblo CO (Country Roots Farm for those in that
area!) did, and they also allowed swaps on pickup. Love zukes, but not turnips?
Swap the turnips for some extra zukes. Etc.

_____

Gardening tip.
On March 26th, 2008 iehuvihs says:

If possible get a rain barrel to catch water off your house, this way you
don't have to pay for water and much better than treated water.

_____

The water is still good
On March 26th, 2008 john2k says:

The water is still good after running over all the shingles on the roof? No
chemicals are picked up from the shingles, etc?

_____

Usually it is.
On March 26th, 2008 Tannim says:

However, check your local laws as for some dumb reasons rain barrels are
illegal in some areas, and it does vary. I know in CO they were because of the
water compacts the state was mixed up in.

_____

It will have fewer chemicals
On March 26th, 2008 winstonkirk says:

It will have fewer chemicals than the water out of the faucet. Don't drink
it without running it through a purification system because it will have
bacteria. A good trick is to drop a silver coin in to kill bacteria and reduce
insects.

_____

Here in Arizona...
On March 26th, 2008 indy elephant says:

We have some raised boxes in the back yard. The corn is eight inches high,
we've already been eating the lettuce, and the cilantro is going nuts... I just
started another batch of seeds for transplanting in a months time.
I'd like to get a couple of hens as well, the city ordinances may be something
to contend with. ;-) I'm going to build a rainwater collection system for one
the buildings as well. No sense in allowing any of our yearly 7.75 inches of
rain to go to waste.

_____

Raise some
On March 26th, 2008 Ron Garcia says:

chickens, too. You can build a small coop is you have enough backyard space.
An 4x8 can accomodate 12 fully grown chickens. That's meat and eggs right
there. I love gardening. You will have a great soil fertilizer from chicken
sh...oops, I mean, manure. My bell peppers last year were huge, almost 5"
from the bottom to the top of the fruit. Tomatoes love the soil mix, eggplants,
okra, succini, spanish squash, thrive extremely well.
"He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the
north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards
it." Confucius

_____

I would love too
On March 26th, 2008 jenmckin says:

but I am afraid that the others in my neighborhood would not like it very
much. I thought about doing it anyway (at least until someone complained) and
then thought that maybe I could shut them up with some free eggs. LOL.

_____

I live in the city
On March 26th, 2008 Ron Garcia says:

I did not realize until after a year that I can keep hens but not roosters.
I shipped all of them to my brother in FL (sigh). Rhode Island reds and a few
cornish hens (the little ones). I have a nice size backyard where I kept about
18 chickens and the a few of each plants I mentioned above. My mother stops by
occasionally to do the ..you know. I can't slaughter the darn birds myself -
much to my mother's amusement. I gathered a lot of eggs especially in the
springtime. My neighbor loves the brown eggs and she knows what I feed my
chickens. She didn't mind the crowing of roosters because she used to live on a
farm in Canada, sort of reminds her of home but I was worried about the cops
knocking on my door so I shipped them anyway. Everyday I get about 8-12 eggs.
The dirt I sweep the coop every two days and dump the dirt around the base of
the plants. I buy hay/straws which is about $7 a bale and they make nice
compost also because they are manure-laden. Hens, by the way, cackle when they
are agitated or when they are about to lay eggs.
"He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the
north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards
it." Confucius

_____

Rabbits aren't noisy
On March 26th, 2008 E. Oregon 4 Ron says:

and I don't think need to eat grain, just grass and alfalfa hay? I am not
sure as I have never raised rabbits! I couldn't butcher a cute little bunny,
(well, maybe I could if I was hungry) I have raised sheep, and don't like the
thought of butchering a cute little lamb, either.

_____

But they
On March 26th, 2008 jenmckin says:
don't lay eggs...Very Happy
No...I would get attached to a rabbit too. Chickens aren't personable so I
don't have a problem with that. lol But I would really want to have the
chickens for the eggs more than anything.
I can just picture my neighbors waking up to a rooster though and thinking..."What
the hell?" rofl

_____

Fertilized eggs are best,
On March 26th, 2008 E. Oregon 4 Ron says:

I wonder if you can take a rooster to the vet and have his
"cackler/crower" removed?
I had a banty rooster once that would crow outside my bedroom window, and my
sister came to stay in her motorhome, and he would sit on the fence outside HER
bedroom window and crow! I call that personable, don't you? Helpful little
guy---

_____

do you have a chicken coop plan
On March 26th, 2008 honeybee says:

to build it at the 4x8 size? I have considered getting chickens. my biggest
drawback is SNAKES!!!!
All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is
violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
Arthur Schopenhauer

_____

There are ways
On March 26th, 2008 Ron Garcia says:

to protect chickens and their eggs from predators. This includes snakes. I
use 4"x4"x12' for base, once the wood base is set together, I will
dig around the exteior of the base about 12" deep and 10 to 12 inches
wide. I will bury an "L" shaped 1/2"x1/2" chicken wire
around the base. The length of the vertical part of the wire mesh must extend
at least to the middle of the base lumber. Remember that all openings for vents
and windows should be covered with 1/4"x1/4" mesh wire. Snakes prefer
the eggs than the chickens. Worst enemy of chickens? Possums, owls, even your
pet dog, if you have one.
One great resource is: BackYardChickens.com
It has a wealth of information on this project.
"He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the
north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards
it." Confucius

_____

Have mine started
On March 26th, 2008 Kay says:

Have lettuce, peas, spinach, carrots all coming up. We had frost the other
night (in Virginia) but fortunately nothing was damaged. I recently bought an
Earthbox from my local garden center. Plan to put it on my deck and grow
tomatoes in it. You can even plan sweet corn in these!
http://www.earthbox.com
is their website.
Happy gardening everyone!

_____

Can't go wrong
On March 26th, 2008 iehuvihs says:

Put your energy into gardening and you will get back a hundred fold. Great
for your health, and you will also be able to hand out slimjims as your
neighbors pass by.

_____

Yep!
On March 26th, 2008 jenmckin says:

Just ordered my strawberry plants, blueberry bush, corn, squash, zucchini,
tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, peppers, garlic, yellow and white onion, pumpkin,
peas, beans, peanuts, etc.
I'm so excited! I've never actually planted a garden before. I have some
knowledgeable friends helping me out but I'm so thrilled. Starting on it at the
end of this week!

_____

Got mine started
On March 26th, 2008 jshowell says:

Not going to put seedlings outside till after the frost. Using this book:
www.squarefootgardening.c....
Got a couple salmonberry bushes, gonna get some blueberry, blackberry bushes
and probably some fruit trees.

_____
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 11:36 am

We got ours planted this past weekend
On March 26th, 2008 LionandLamb says:

In Christ,
Dave
www.lionandlambministry.c...
www.lionandlambtv.com

_____

Started germinating
On March 26th, 2008 i4freedom says:

seeds a few weeks ago. They look great. All organic seeds. My yard is very
small but I will manage with pots or an elevated garden. I hope to can some hot
sauce, tomatoe sauce, and jelly!
Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

_____

here in south east texas, got it going a few weeks ago.
On March 26th, 2008 honeybee says:

am so excited. i have had a garden most of my 33 yrs. of marriage. revived
it after a 2 year hiatus. ordered seeds from heirloom seeds.
All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is
violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
Arthur Schopenhauer

_____

Same here
On March 26th, 2008 sistagirl86 says:

in my part of south east TX. Got the tomatoes, peppers, cukes, strawberries,
squash, cilantro, basil all in and coming along nicely. Fruit trees all look to
be healthy. Have wild grapes that grow here but also adding a few Concords
(just to see if they'll grow/produce). Loads of dewberries that grow along the
fences in the spring; all of the blooms make me think this will be a good year
berries.
Just broke ground on a second, much larger area for feed corn (for the
chickens), sweet corn (for us), beans, purple hulls and maybe some new
potatoes.
Will wait a little longer to put in the okra since that's one of the few things
that seems to thrive in the hottest part of the summer.
The post about the watermelons makes me realize I'm gonna have to do a little
more tilling 'cause now I just gotta plant some of those.
Here's hoping we don't get hit with a heatwave this summer!

_____

Have to wait until at least May here in Michigan.
On March 26th, 2008 iehuvihs says:

Gardening is great, what you may want to try is to get a group of people
together and each one specialize in a few vegetables. Instead of trying to
plant all of them yourself you can exchange. I have my Ron Paul Victory Garden
all planned. Even plan to plant a Liberty tree in the middle of my front lawn
for discussing politics with neighbors.

_____

The snow just came here in
On March 26th, 2008 m72mc says:

The snow just came here in Sweden. Though soon it´s spring, but I have no
garden. I have promised my mother to come help her with her garden late in
April.

_____

Heja Sverige! Snon kom har i
On March 26th, 2008 FreedomRules says:

Heja Sverige!
Snon kom har i USA idag ocksa (Montana). Ha det sa bra och sprid budskapet :-).
Friheten styr!

_____

I wish!
On March 26th, 2008 randyjones says:

There is still a little clump of snow in my yard, though most has melted by
now. I was hoping to start some small plants inside this year so they would
have a head start while things are warming up outside. Haven't made any
progress, though.
I'm at 5,500 feet in the "hills" between Lake Tahoe and Reno, NV.
Best wishes to all on a bountiful garden this year!
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I'm starting two victory
On March 26th, 2008 Kevin Tuma says:

I'm starting two victory gardens next month as well. Anyone with ANY amount
of land (even a suburban backyard) should be doing this.
SUPPORT OUR FOUNDERS' AMERICA
Support the Constitution of the United States

_____

Sabbath Year
On April 1st, 2008 dCarr says:

According to the Bible, you are supposed to only grow food 6 years out of
seven. This year is the seventh (from everything I can tell), so expect a bunch
of crop failures.

_____

My victory garden is started...
On March 26th, 2008 pegarizona says:

Herbs... basil, parsley, oregano,cilantro and garlic chives and in the big
garden I am planting tomatoes, squash, eggplant, yellow cucumbers,ocra, bell
peppers,green beans,radishes and carrots. I wanted to grow potatoes and corn
out here but no such luck. I am from North West PA Amish country and it was
easier to grow back there not to mention all the wild berries we had for
canning.
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Oh man, homegrown
On March 26th, 2008 akak says:

Oh man, homegrown watermelon! I would almost fly to Mississippi just to
taste that! Needless to say, here in Alaska, any watermelons we do get (from
Mexico?) pale in comparison.
Cabbages and the other cole vegetables all do well here, and lettuce, and
carrots and beets (I don't touch those, though). I like root parsley also, a
traditional Polish vegetable. Tomatoes and beans are almost a lost cause here
unless you have ideal location and ideal weather.
No tree fruits here except crabapples, but I do grow a lot of gooseberries,
which make fantastic jam (well, I think so, but not everyone agrees).

_____

I'm planting...
On March 26th, 2008 martfuncher says:

... yellow-meated watermelons this year. Same as red/pink ones basically
with a hint of savory (think cantaloupe).

_____

Hey, I know those! Oh man,
On March 26th, 2008 akak says:
Hey, I know those! Oh man, that's no fair --- now I have a hankering for that!
My great-grandparents in Alabama (Citronelle) had a large farm and grew those
yellow watermelons too --- wow, were they ever good! I would eat it until I was
sick!
But I haven't seen or tasted one in thirty years.

_____

I'd send ya one...
On March 26th, 2008 martfuncher says:

.. but shipping would probably be $50.
=P



Wahoo…You are
awesome!





On May 15th, 2008 pegarizona
says:

Thanks so much for doing this for us. I am also impressed that the links to
web searches are also active. I keep telling myself to save those to my
favorites list and never did. I forward to you 5 stars and 1 big atta girl!

"I freed thousands of slaves. I could have freed thousands more if they
had known they were slaves."
-- Harriet Tubman



thank you
both...





On May 15th, 2008 photoshopwiz
says:

~
for the kind acknowledgement. I felt bad because the garden forum was such a
monumental thread that made a lot of you happy and it was very sad that it was
missing!

I wanted to surprise you, give you a big present and cheer y'all up. Had I
known how long the endeavor would take, I might not have undertaken it! It was
over 5 hours of reformatting to make it readable, and some of the time was just
spent sorting out my confusion because the daily paul page numbers and the
google page numbers did not match. But I admit, it was my choice and I felt
compelled to see it through.

I finally posted it and crawled into bed at 4am! When I checked 5 hours
later, noone had even noticed my humongous post. I was ready to leave the
dailypaul, since I had already been uncharacteristically flamed last night and
was really a rough time for me.

Anyway, peg and mart, you're the absolute BEST, and thanks for noticing.
It's really appreciated! ;-)



Thank you
photoshopwiz...





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

... for all the hard work saving what you could of the previous post! I know
that reformatting text like that is grueling drudge work. =)

*hugs@photo*



"laugh"




On May 15th, 2008 MageesterMixit
says:

got this up didn't ya, hey! I'm not laughin' at, I love gardens. I saw the
post of the great garden forum was missin'. It was big! Gardens (plants) are
naturally therapeutic.



Hehe...




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. now if we can keep the flagger-monkeys at bay...



NON-GMO food
is a serious





On May 15th, 2008 lastmovement
says:

NON-GMO food is a serious issue. Im not much of a gardener but its a good
thing to start on. I have no yard where I live but my mother keeps a lovely
garden filled with herbs and veggies. Great stuff for you



And it tastes
WAY better...





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. then store bought junk. Wink



Yeah




On May 15th, 2008 MageesterMixit
says:

I really don't know what to think about it, its not my sight 'n all. These
are serious and very serious issues here!

I mean, I mean... I..mean a person needs a release.

some nice little guitar work:

Alice's Restaurant: little over a minute long

http://www.youtube.com/wa...

Arlo Guthrie/Motorcycle Song

http://www.youtube.com/wa...



What idiots
would flag the





On May 15th, 2008 hawkiye
says:

What idiots would flag the garden posts?

-----
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Freelanders
Self Reliance & Preparedness Forums
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 12:14 pm

Good
question...





On May 15th, 2008 bonnieblue
says:

It seems sort of juvenille to flag it and, considering how many of us
clearly enjoy and benefit from this post, spiteful.

"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you.
Then you win". --Mahatma Gandhi



I think there
is..





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. enough of them on Daily Paul. Apparently... =P



I am working
on it got my





On May 15th, 2008 hawkiye
says:

I am working on it got my beds all ready and put in a grape arbor and 3
grape plants. I also have black berries raspberries and strawberries. Just need
to get the veggies in the ground now. Our season starts late in SW Idaho.

I planted fruit trees two years ago Apples, Apricots, Nectarines, Pears, and
Cherries. The Apple and Nectarine died so I replanted new ones this year but
the Cherry tree is loaded which I didn't expect for another year or two and the
Pear tree has some pears already.

-----
Please Visit New
Freelanders
Self Reliance & Preparedness Forums




Sounds like..




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. you got it going on. =)



Hooray, It's
Back





On May 15th, 2008 UberNeo
says:

Love the Liberty Harvest title.

I have to admit, I haven't done any real gardening since I helped my parents
as a little kid (not counting weeding and mowing).

Even though I've been wanting to "plant something" since last
summer, believing as I do in self-sufficiency and subsidiarity, and the fact
that Ron Paul's hobby is gardening, there were two recent things that finally
got me started - Martfuncher's forum (kudos to you), and the big push for the
"100 Mile Diet"
in my city (Richmond, B.C.)



We need the
"100 Mile Diet" thing...





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. in every county in the country. Being dependent on a
"just-in-time" food system that only provided local supplies of food
for four days and having to pay packaging and shipping costs for toting the
stuff all the world and country several times is insane and wasteful. Plus the
food quality and nutrition downright sux....



I agree, at
least for the





On May 15th, 2008 akak
says:

I agree, at least for the most part --- but that "100 mile" thing
would sure limit my diet! Salmon, moose, wild berries, some seasonal greens,
local milk and eggs would just about cover it for us up here --- while
consigning 95% of the population to starvation.

Uh oh, I think we're screwed!



Well...




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. I don't think they mean a system where you can ONLY eat stuff from within
100 miles, but having the infrastructure where you can grow and process locally
if needed. Like it used to be... Wink



Oh, I know, I
was just





On May 15th, 2008 akak
says:

Oh, I know, I was just playing with you there ---- a little. I only wish we
HAD more local produce; it's out there, but not in great quantity, and only for
certain crops, as you can probably imagine (not much chance of finding locally
grown corn or melons here, nor even apples or pears).



What's this
have to do Paul?





On May 15th, 2008 L.G.
says:

???



If




On May 15th, 2008 oldmom
says:

If he reads it he'll pick up some good gardening tips.
Paul likes gardening and since it is considered the #1 hobby in the U.S. I
think it is appropriate.
I also wouldn't be surprised if this grows into something bigger. People are
connecting through this thread and once people connect they are more likely to
help each other.
Gardenroots are deeper than grassroots.



Grassroots?




On May 15th, 2008 fanofwalt
says:

Say, that's a gardening term if ever I heard one.

You know, it struck me pretty solidly with RP's interview on NPR 5/14/08
that he is not really wanting to be the prez; perhaps not even so much willing
to be the prez at this point. He has wanted to get the message out and I don't
think he ever believed it would go so far as to actually risk him getting into
office. Several of his statements on the interview indicated that the
presidency is not the golden ring he is after (which bummed me to no end). So
maybe this blog should rightly no longer be dedicated to getting RP elected
president -- and this opinion comes from a seriously dedicated RP supporter who
has been working to get him elected to that office! -- which would leave us to
working towards restoring the Republic.

Now, a return to a Constitutional Republic; an awakening of Americans who
become fervent about liberty, peace and prosperity? Oh yeah. Many topics
support that theme, including Victory Gardens.

Plus? You can invite a friend over to help you garden. Non-threatening,
friendly, side-by-side work that takes longer than five minutes. While you're
working, what can you talk about, at length? Why, restoring the Republic, of
course! So the gardening can work as an evangelical tool to bring people
around.





*****EDIT: Apparently only I can access the old post since I created it. Oh
well, maybe manystrom will fix the old one. At least I know it is still there.
******

Although the old post has been flagged it can still be accessed here:

http://www.dailypaul.com/...

It even let me add a new comment to the old post...

Let the fun begin for Anybody Getting Their Gardens Ready? Part 2...

=)


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Grassroots?




On May 15th, 2008 fanofwalt
says:

Say, that's a gardening term if ever I heard one.

You know, it struck me pretty solidly with RP's interview on NPR 5/14/08
that he is not really wanting to be the prez; perhaps not even so much willing
to be the prez at this point. He has wanted to get the message out and I don't
think he ever believed it would go so far as to actually risk him getting into
office. Several of his statements on the interview indicated that the
presidency is not the golden ring he is after (which bummed me to no end). So
maybe this blog should rightly no longer be dedicated to getting RP elected
president -- and this opinion comes from a seriously dedicated RP supporter who
has been working to get him elected to that office! -- which would leave us to
working towards restoring the Republic.

Now, a return to a Constitutional Republic; an awakening of Americans who
become fervent about liberty, peace and prosperity? Oh yeah. Many topics
support that theme, including Victory Gardens.

Plus? You can invite a friend over to help you garden. Non-threatening,
friendly, side-by-side work that takes longer than five minutes. While you're
working, what can you talk about, at length? Why, restoring the Republic, of
course! So the gardening can work as an evangelical tool to bring people
around.



Well..




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. right now you are living under a fascist system (fascism = corporate +
govt combined) that can deprive you of food in four days.

The first line of defense against tyranny is self-reliance. The most basic
and urgent elements of self-reliance are food, water and shelter. People who
are hungry tend to beg at their masters feet.

People who can provide themselves the basics of existence are more able to
defend their liberties. People who grow their own food are much healthier
because the food is more nutritious and the exercise required leaves them in
better shape. People who eat better food and exercise more do a better job
of supporting Ron Paul
and are more capable of defending their freedoms.

Any further questions? =)

"Fascism should rightly be called Corporatism as it is a merger of
state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini - the "Father of
Fascism"




If You Mean
"What's This Have To Do With Ron Paul"...
avatar
hawkiye

Posts : 215
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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Fri 16 May 2008, 12:15 pm

If You Mean
"What's This Have To Do With Ron Paul"...





On May 15th, 2008 UberNeo
says:

I don't know - probably nothing; but then, I know he's into gardening and I
know he believes in people taking responsibility for their own lives (growing
your own food is one way of doing that).

Google "Ron Paul Gardening" - you get 564,000 hits - that''s more
than Googling "Ron Paul Bigfoot" (77,600 hits), or "Ron Paul
Chemtrails" (121,000), or "Ron Paul CFR" (226,000). Obviously
there are gardeners out there who are interested in Ron Paul. I guess talking
about it here will help draw those people to the site (and maybe provide them
with an education).

And before you go check, Googling "Ron Paul UFO's" gives 1,020,000
hits - which means that there are all sorts out there, but I'd rather attract
gardeners than UFOlogists - not that I'm knocking them :-)



Some others:
Ron Paul &





On May 15th, 2008 akak
says:

Some others:

Ron Paul & Gold: 335,000

Ron Paul & Hang nails: 1320

Ron Paul & Nosehair: 12,200

Ron Paul & Pterodactyls: 912

Ron Paul & Atlantis: 71,600

Ron Paul & Rabies: 21,400

Ron Paul & Dracula: 68,000

Ron Paul & Swordfish: 90,700 (?)

Ron Paul & Darth Vader: 50,700

Ron Paul & Peeps: 49,500

Ron Paul & Napalm: 21,400

Ron Paul & Toadstools: 426



Ron Paul &
Flagger Monkeys





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

32,700



I wonder if..




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. UFO's are "space tractors" doing interstellar gardening?



LOL... :-)




On May 15th, 2008 bonnieblue
says:

"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you.
Then you win". --Mahatma Gandhi



Hehe...




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

=)
*hugs@bonnie*



Getting ready
next week to





On May 15th, 2008 akak
says:

Getting ready next week to plant lettuces, broccoli and leeks; rhubarb and
chives have been poking up in the last week. Think I'm going to give up on
tomatoes this year, though, as the last two here in AK have been too cool and
cloudy to allow them to get very far (still hard green little nuggets in early
September).



Thats a shame
about your tomatoes...





On May 15th, 2008 bonnieblue
says:

Were you able to pickle or fry them or were they to immature even for that?

"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you.
Then you win". --Mahatma Gandhi



Temps in
Alaska





On May 15th, 2008 Kay
says:

I hope the temps warm up from June 13 to 29 - I'll be in Alaska those 2
weeks! Sure would like to have some warm days (I'm prepared with mosquito
netting).



The
mosquito...





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. the Alaskan state bird. Wink



Anybody
getting their gardens ready?





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

The Liberty Harvest is on its way!
>Wink



BTW, you may
not recall but I had starling trouble...





On May 15th, 2008 bonnieblue
says:

Well, now I don't. We put in garden netting and an owl (we named Henry) and
then replanted everything that had been damaged or stolen.This is the first
time in 16 years of gardening we've had to take protective measures against
birds but luckily I always keep "back-up" seedlings for everything we
plant and just had to go through and pop them in. The garden is doing great
again and the starlings are frustrated... ;-)

"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you.
Then you win". --Mahatma Gandhi



Go Henry!




On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

Could you describe the netting and how you have it installed?



It's just
basic fruit tree and garden netting we bought...





On May 15th, 2008 bonnieblue
says:

locally in a roll that was 15'x45' and cut into large 'blankets' that we
draped over the beds.Our plant beds are rather large so we used supporting
stakes (approx. 2' above ground height) at the corners,sides and centers to
keep it from laying on the seedlings and to leave room for growth. The edges
that touch the ground we then anchored with chunks of dirt. It worked like a
charm. Another way to install it for smaller areas is to put stakes at the
corners and run twine around the tops of the stakes connecting them along the
sides and by an "x" from corner to corner across the center and then
lay the netting and secure at the bottom edges the same way we did.

Here is a link with an example of netting similar to what we used...
http://www.gardenersnet.c...



Have you
seen..





On May 15th, 2008 martfuncher
says:

.. any of the starlings trying to investigate the netting? How well is the
owl working?



Well, on the
first morning after we installed...





On May 15th, 2008 bonnieblue
says:

the nets it did look like there were some spots that may have been landed on
but we aren't seeing many birds at all in the garden now and the few that do
pass through don't linger. I really can't say if the result we have had is more
due to the owl or netting since we put them both in at close to the same time
but the owl is good for a laugh and the netting a physical barrier and or bird
problem is currently under control. In order for scarecrow owls to be most
effective they have to be moved around at least every other day and have a
rotating head or what you've got is an owl shaped lawn decoration. Sooo...
Henry makes a garden tour with great frequency. We only put the nets over beds
with the very smallest seedlings since the larger plants weren't effected and
still haven't been bothered even though now they are all that isn't covered. We
plan on removing them completely when the plants are more mature and less
likely to be permanently damaged from the occasional marauding bird. Henry, on
the other hand, will be patrolling all season...:-)

"First they ignore you. Then they ridicule you. Then they fight you.
Then you win". --Mahatma Gandhi
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hawkiye

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Re: Liberty Harvest: Anybody gettting their gardens ready? Part

Post by hawkiye on Sat 17 May 2008, 4:48 pm

Got A black berry and raspberry plants in to day got my grapes tied up on the arbor and will be putting in the blue berry plants and finishing the garden this evening hen it cools off a bit.
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